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District Level Plan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Duquesne City SD

District Level Plan

07/01/2016 - 06/30/2019


District Profile

Demographics

300 Kennedy Ave

Duquesne, PA 15110

(412)466-5300

Superintendent: Barbara McDonnell

Director of Special Education: Debra Zimarowski

Planning Process

 

  • The District Leadership Team will review the District Comprehension Plan requirements and based on the PDE District Work Flow Chart, the team will develop a timeline for the development of the plan.
  • The District Leadership Team will discuss and select the District Comprehensive Planning Team Committee Members who will work collaboratively to develop the plan.
  • A District Core Comprehensive Planning Team of selected District Administrators and Staff will also be created.
  • The Acting Superintendent, or Designee, will share the online planning tool with the District Comprehensive Planning Team Committee and the Core Comprehensive Planning Team.
  • Following each meeting, all new and updated information will be entered into the online planning tool and provided to all District Comprehensive Planning Team Members and Core Comprehensive Planning Team Members for their review and recommendations. 
  • During the planning process, the District Comprehensive Planning Team will share the DRAFT of the District Comprehensive Plan with the administrators and staff for district feedback.
  • Once the District Comprehensive Plan is completed, the plan will be presented to the Receiver and School Board for approval.
  • There will be a 28 day public review of the plan.
  • The Acting Superintendent and the Receiver will approve the plan and submit it to Pennsylvania Department of Education prior to the due date. 

 

Mission Statement

The District Mission Statement

The Duquesne City School District exists to serve the diverse academic, physical, social, and emotional needs of its learners in a supportive and caring environment.

Vision Statement

The Duquesne City School District will maintain for its students a diverse, supportive, healthy, and inspiring academic environment.   We will actively engage our families and community since they are essential to the success of our students and the success of our school.

Shared Values

The Duquesne City School District believes that:

  • Education is a shared and collected responsibility of all stakeholders  (students, staff, parents, and community) to maximize student success.
  • A student centered environment is maintained through differentiated instructional planning that incorporates engaging learning activities to meet the needs of all students.
  • The school district provides a safe, secure, and nurturing environment where stakeholders  are respected and a quality  education program is maintained.
  • The commitment to continuous improvement guides decisions and actions.

 

Educational Community

Approximately 12 miles south of Pittsburgh lies the historic borough of Duquesne, a small suburban community located along the banks of the Monongahela River. It was incorporated in 1891 and encompasses a total area of 2.0 square miles. Duquesne is predominately a residential community with a strong commitment to education. The Duquesne City School District serves the community of Duquesne. The district educates approximately 400 students, grades PreK through sixth grade with 100% of pupils receiving a federal free lunch.  Students are eligible to receive special education services, participate in 504 plans, and receive gifted services. Currently, 28% are identified as receiving Special Education services. The school receives federal Title IA funding to provide interventions to students at risk of failing. Families of tudents in grades 7-12 have the option of attending either the East Allegheny or West Mifflin Area school districts as required by the School Code section 16.1607.1.

Duquesne Elementary facilitates learning through:

  • instruction correlated with 21st Century classroom technology including Smartboards, iPads for students and teachers, computer labs, Apple TVs, and document cameras,
  • curriculum aligned to Pennsylvania Core Standards,
  • instructional coaches who bring evidence-based practices into classrooms by working with teachers and other school leaders,
  • benchmark assessments that enable instructional staff to monitor and evaluate student learning, plan instruction, communicate expectations for learning, and predict future performance,
  • extended day/year programming for all students to focus on core academic learning and enrichment activities to enhance student success,
  • opportunities for families, community members, and school staff to engage in meaningful activities that support and improve the learning, development, and health of children, and
  • student supportive services including guidance and counseling, health and wellness, and other necessary services as part of a comprehensive program to meet students' academic, social, and emotional growth.

 

Planning Committee

Name

Role

NOT APPLICABLE

High School Teacher - Regular Education

NOT APPLICABLE

High School Teacher - Special Education

NOT APPLICABLE

Middle School Teacher - Regular Education

NOT APPLICABLE

Middle School Teacher - Special Education

Timothy Caldwell

Business Representative : Professional Education

Eric  Harper

Student Services Director/Specialist : Special Education

Timiko Hawkins

Parent : Professional Education Special Education

Jennifer Jennings

Administrator : Professional Education

Barbara McDonnell

Administrator : Professional Education Special Education

Nancy  Moore

Elementary School Teacher - Special Education : Professional Education Special Education

Nancy  Olenik

Ed Specialist - Other : Professional Education

Frank  Piccolino

Business Representative : Professional Education

Michelle Roland

Parent : Professional Education

Sandy  Rozgonyi

Community Representative : Professional Education

Celeste  Rudge

Instructional Coach/Mentor Librarian : Professional Education

Samantha Utley

Elementary School Teacher - Regular Education : Professional Education Special Education

Andrew  Vamos

Community Representative : Professional Education

Stan  Whiteman

Administrator : Professional Education

Debra Zimarowski

Special Education Director/Specialist : Professional Education Special Education

 


Core Foundations

Standards

Mapping and Alignment

Elementary Education-Primary Level

Standards

Mapping

Alignment

Arts and Humanities

Needs Improvement

Developing

Career Education and Work

Non Existent

Non Existent

Civics and Government

Non Existent

Non Existent

PA Core Standards: English Language Arts

Developing

Developing

PA Core Standards: Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects

Non Existent

Non Existent

PA Core Standards: Mathematics

Developing

Developing

Economics

Non Existent

Non Existent

Environment and Ecology

Non Existent

Non Existent

Family and Consumer Sciences

Non Existent

Non Existent

Geography

Non Existent

Non Existent

Health, Safety and Physical Education

Developing

Developing

History

Non Existent

Non Existent

Science and Technology and Engineering Education

Needs Improvement

Developing

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Math

Needs Improvement

Developing

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Reading

Needs Improvement

Developing

American School Counselor Association for Students

Non Existent

Accomplished

Early Childhood Education: Infant-Toddler→Second Grade

Developing

Developing

English Language Proficiency

Non Existent

Non Existent

Interpersonal Skills

Non Existent

Non Existent

School Climate

Developing

Developing

 

Explanation for standard areas checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent":

"Non-existent" checks indicate areas not addressed at the Elementary School level.  While the English/Language Arts (ELA) and math curriculums are mapped and aligned, the remaining areas are in process.  History, science, social studies, and related arts are addressed within the ELA and math programs.  Science standards are addressed via ASSETT learning materials and SAS resources.

Elementary Education-Intermediate Level

Standards

Mapping

Alignment

Arts and Humanities

Needs Improvement

Developing

Career Education and Work

Non Existent

Non Existent

Civics and Government

Non Existent

Non Existent

PA Core Standards: English Language Arts

Developing

Developing

PA Core Standards: Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects

Non Existent

Non Existent

PA Core Standards: Mathematics

Developing

Developing

Economics

Non Existent

Non Existent

Environment and Ecology

Non Existent

Non Existent

Family and Consumer Sciences

Non Existent

Non Existent

Geography

Non Existent

Non Existent

Health, Safety and Physical Education

Developing

Developing

History

Non Existent

Non Existent

Science and Technology and Engineering Education

Needs Improvement

Developing

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Math

Needs Improvement

Developing

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Reading

Needs Improvement

Developing

American School Counselor Association for Students

Non Existent

Accomplished

English Language Proficiency

Developing

Non Existent

Interpersonal Skills

Non Existent

Non Existent

School Climate

Developing

Developing

 

Explanation for standard areas checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent":

"Non-existent" checks indicate areas not addressed at the Elementary School level.  While the English/Language Arts (ELA) and math curriculums are mapped and aligned, the remaining areas are in process.  History, science, social studies, and related arts are addressed within the ELA and math programs.  Science standards are addressed via ASSETT learning materials and SAS resources.
 

Middle Level

Standards

Mapping

Alignment

Arts and Humanities

Non Existent

Non Existent

Career Education and Work

Non Existent

Non Existent

Civics and Government

Non Existent

Non Existent

PA Core Standards: English Language Arts

Non Existent

Non Existent

PA Core Standards: Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects

Non Existent

Non Existent

PA Core Standards: Mathematics

Non Existent

Non Existent

Economics

Non Existent

Non Existent

Environment and Ecology

Non Existent

Non Existent

Family and Consumer Sciences

Non Existent

Non Existent

Geography

Non Existent

Non Existent

Health, Safety and Physical Education

Non Existent

Non Existent

History

Non Existent

Non Existent

Science and Technology and Engineering Education

Non Existent

Non Existent

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Math

Non Existent

Non Existent

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Reading

Non Existent

Non Existent

American School Counselor Association for Students

Non Existent

Non Existent

English Language Proficiency

Non Existent

Non Existent

Interpersonal Skills

Non Existent

Non Existent

School Climate

Non Existent

Non Existent

World Language

Non Existent

Non Existent

 

Explanation for standard areas checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent":

The Duquesne City School District operates an Elementary School, serving students in grades Pre-K - 6th grade. Students in grades 7-12 receive their education at their choice of East Allegheny or West Mifflin Area School Districts per the School Code Section 16.1607.1.

High School Level

Standards

Mapping

Alignment

Arts and Humanities

Non Existent

Non Existent

Career Education and Work

Non Existent

Non Existent

Civics and Government

Non Existent

Non Existent

PA Core Standards: English Language Arts

Non Existent

Non Existent

PA Core Standards: Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects

Non Existent

Non Existent

PA Core Standards: Mathematics

Non Existent

Non Existent

Economics

Non Existent

Non Existent

Environment and Ecology

Non Existent

Non Existent

Family and Consumer Sciences

Non Existent

Non Existent

Geography

Non Existent

Non Existent

Health, Safety and Physical Education

Non Existent

Non Existent

History

Non Existent

Non Existent

Science and Technology and Engineering Education

Non Existent

Non Existent

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Math

Non Existent

Non Existent

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Reading

Non Existent

Non Existent

American School Counselor Association for Students

Non Existent

Non Existent

English Language Proficiency

Non Existent

Non Existent

Interpersonal Skills

Non Existent

Non Existent

School Climate

Non Existent

Non Existent

World Language

Non Existent

Non Existent

 

Explanation for standard areas checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent":

The Duquesne City School District operates an Elementary School, serving students in grades Pre-K - 6th grade. Students in grades 7-12 receive their education at their choice of East Allegheny or West Mifflin Area School Districts per the School Code Section 16.1607.1.

Adaptations

Elementary Education-Primary Level

·      Arts and Humanities

·      PA Core Standards: English Language Arts

·      PA Core Standards: Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects

·      PA Core Standards: Mathematics

·      Environment and Ecology

·      Geography

·      Health, Safety and Physical Education

·      History

·      Science and Technology and Engineering Education

Elementary Education-Intermediate Level

·      Arts and Humanities

·      PA Core Standards: English Language Arts

·      PA Core Standards: Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects

·      PA Core Standards: Mathematics

·      Environment and Ecology

·      Geography

·      Health, Safety and Physical Education

·      History

·      Science and Technology and Engineering Education

Middle Level

No standards have been identified for this content area.

High School Level

No standards have been identified for this content area.

Explanation for any standards checked:

Duquesne Elementary School has aligned the math and ELA curriculums to the PA Core Standard. The District is working toward alignment of Literacy in History/Social Studies and Science to the newer, more rigorous PA Core Standards as they are released.  Our district has elected to remain true to the integrated standards as brought forward by the national body of work.  Our curricula encompasses the Pennsylvania Core Standards and by relying on the integrity of the Common Core State Standards continues to elevate rigor and complexity. We are emphasizing the mathematical and ELA standards of practice across our curricula.

Curriculum

Planned Instruction

Elementary Education-Primary Level

Curriculum Characteristics

Status

Objectives of planned courses, instructional units or interdisciplinary studies to be achieved by all students are identified for each subject area.

Developing

Content, including materials and activities and estimated instructional time to be devoted to achieving the academic standards are identified.

Developing

The relationship between the objectives of a planned course, instructional unit or interdisciplinary studies and academic standards are identified.

Developing

Procedures for measurement of mastery of the objectives of a planned course, instructional unit or interdisciplinary studies are identified.

Developing

 

Processes used to ensure Accomplishment:

The Curriculum Steering Committee, under the leadership of the Acting Superintendent, meets twice monthly to plan, review, update, and problem-solve curriculum related issues.  The committee monitors implementation and makes recommendations to the administrative team as warranted.

 

Explanation for any standards areas checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent". How the LEA plans to address their incorporation:

None of the standards areas are checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent".

Elementary Education-Intermediate Level

Curriculum Characteristics

Status

Objectives of planned courses, instructional units or interdisciplinary studies to be achieved by all students are identified for each subject area.

Developing

Content, including materials and activities and estimated instructional time to be devoted to achieving the academic standards are identified.

Developing

The relationship between the objectives of a planned course, instructional unit or interdisciplinary studies and academic standards are identified.

Developing

Procedures for measurement of mastery of the objectives of a planned course, instructional unit or interdisciplinary studies are identified.

Developing

 

Processes used to ensure Accomplishment:

The Curriculum Steering Committee, under the leadership of the Acting Superintendent, meets twice monthly to plan, review, update, and problem-solve curriculum related issues.  The committee monitors implementation and makes recommendations to the administrative team as warranted.

 

Explanation for any standards areas checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent". How the LEA plans to address their incorporation:

None of the standards areas are checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent".

Middle Level

Curriculum Characteristics

Status

Objectives of planned courses, instructional units or interdisciplinary studies to be achieved by all students are identified for each subject area.

Non Existent

Content, including materials and activities and estimated instructional time to be devoted to achieving the academic standards are identified.

Non Existent

The relationship between the objectives of a planned course, instructional unit or interdisciplinary studies and academic standards are identified.

Non Existent

Procedures for measurement of mastery of the objectives of a planned course, instructional unit or interdisciplinary studies are identified.

Non Existent

 

Processes used to ensure Accomplishment:

The Duquesne City School District operates an Elementary School, serving students in grades Pre-K - 6th grade. Students in grades 7-12 receive their education at their choice of East Allegheny or West Mifflin Area School Districts per the School Code Section 16.1607.1.

 

Explanation for any standards areas checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent". How the LEA plans to address their incorporation:

The Duquesne City School District operates an Elementary School, serving students in grades Pre-K - 6th grade. Students in grades 7-12 receive their education at their choice of East Allegheny or West Mifflin Area School Districts per the School Code Section 16.1607.1.

High School Level

Curriculum Characteristics

Status

Objectives of planned courses, instructional units or interdisciplinary studies to be achieved by all students are identified for each subject area.

Non Existent

Content, including materials and activities and estimated instructional time to be devoted to achieving the academic standards are identified.

Non Existent

The relationship between the objectives of a planned course, instructional unit or interdisciplinary studies and academic standards are identified.

Non Existent

Procedures for measurement of mastery of the objectives of a planned course, instructional unit or interdisciplinary studies are identified.

Non Existent

 

Processes used to ensure Accomplishment:

The Duquesne City School District operates an Elementary School, serving students in grades Pre-K - 6th grade. Students in grades 7-12 receive their education at their choice of East Allegheny or West Mifflin Area School Districts per the School Code Section 16.1607.1.

 

Explanation for any standards areas checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent". How the LEA plans to address their incorporation:

The Duquesne City School District operates an Elementary School, serving students in grades Pre-K - 6th grade. Students in grades 7-12 receive their education at their choice of East Allegheny or West Mifflin Area School Districts per the School Code Section 16.1607.1.

Modification and Accommodations

Explain how planned instruction contains modifications and accommodations that allow all students at all mental and physical ability levels to access and master a rigorous standards aligned curriculum.

The Duquesne Elementary School implements a curriculum that provides remediation and enrichment based lessons to reach all levels of learners. With the use of quarterly testing, the staff developed instructional practices that focus on the needs of individual students through the creation and use of data based Individual Learning Plans (ILPs). The reading and math curricula include intervention lessons for at-risk students, components for reteaching, small group differentiated instruction, and multiple modality evaluation for students who need additional supports. The introduction of a flexible grouping period (RTII/MTSS Flex Time) allows for teachers to meet the needs of individual students on a daily basis. Supports for special education students are the same, with the specially designed instruction, adaptations, and accommodations based on the students lEP.
The Duquesne Elementary School District has aligned the mathematics and ELA curriculums to the Pennsylvania Common Core Framework. The district is currently in the process of aligning the science and social studies curriculums to the framework.

Instruction

Instructional Strategies

·      Formal classroom observations focused on instruction

·      Walkthroughs targeted on instruction

·      Annual Instructional evaluations

·      Peer evaluation/coaching

·      Instructional Coaching

Regular Lesson Plan Review

·         Administrators

·         Building Supervisors

·         Instructional Coaches

Provide brief explanation of LEA's process for incorporating selected strategies.

The implementation of the Principal Effectiveness Tool has been put into place as the main tool to evaluate the new principal and assistant principal. The Administrative Leadership Team (Acting Superintendent, Principal, Assistant Principal, Special Education Consultant, Technology Director and Business Manager) meet bi-weekly to discuss initiatives throughout the school, and concerns about the daily activities of the elementary school.  These meetings serve as a time where each individual can ask questions, discuss issues, and find resolutions to issues in the school itself.  An open dialogue has been cultivated with the staff and the principal. The professional staff helps to improve the principal and assistant principal by holding them accountable for supportive actions that need to be taken in an effective manner.  Efforts to support staff and students are developed bottom up under the direction of the principal and assistant principal. Groups of educators are working together to formulate ideas, create plans of action, and follow through on those plans with the support of administration.

Ensuring that there is a system within the school district that fully ensures consistent implementation of a standards aligned curriculum framework is off to a strong, slow start.  Currently, the PA Instructional Framework is being utilized by every teacher.  The use of the framework is monitored by the instructional coaches and principals.  Teachers submit modules with their weekly lesson plans to ensure topics are being covered. This is monitored by the administrators.  Teachers utilize the framework to plan daily instruction in addition to remediation and enrichment activities on Study Island and Flex time.

 All teachers have been exposed to Explicit Instruction and the components are monitored by principal/assistant principal's and instructional coaches' walkthroughs and observations. Peer evaluation is on-going. 

School Wide use of data is an area for continued growth.  Currently all teachers use data to write Individual Learning Plans (ILPs) for each student without an Individualized Education Plan (IEP - Chapter 14). That data is discussed in twice monthly grade level groups and successes are highlighted.  Teachers have used the data to focus instruction for daily planning, FLEX time, ILPs, and extended day instruction.

 

Provide brief explanation for strategies not selected and how the LEA plans to address their incorporation.

All strategies have been selected, and are in use by administration and professonal staff.

Responsiveness to Student Needs

Elementary Education-Primary Level

Instructional Practices

Status

Structured grouping practices are used to meet student needs.

Full Implementation

Flexible instructional time or other schedule-related practices are used to meet student needs.

Full Implementation

Differentiated instruction is used to meet student needs.

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

A variety of practices that may include structured grouping, flexible scheduling and differentiated instruction are used to meet the needs of gifted students.

Not Applicable

 

If necessary, provide further explanation. (Required explanation if column selected was

Currently, there are no students who are eligible for specially designed gifted instruction in the district.

Elementary Education-Intermediate Level

Instructional Practices

Status

Structured grouping practices are used to meet student needs.

Full Implementation

Flexible instructional time or other schedule-related practices are used to meet student needs.

Full Implementation

Differentiated instruction is used to meet student needs.

Full Implementation

A variety of practices that may include structured grouping, flexible scheduling and differentiated instruction are used to meet the needs of gifted students.

Not Applicable

 

If necessary, provide further explanation. (Required explanation if column selected was

Currently, there are no students who are eligible for specially designed gifted instruction in the district. 

Middle Level

Instructional Practices

Status

Structured grouping practices are used to meet student needs.

Not Applicable

Flexible instructional time or other schedule-related practices are used to meet student needs.

Not Applicable

Differentiated instruction is used to meet student needs.

Not Applicable

A variety of practices that may include structured grouping, flexible scheduling and differentiated instruction are used to meet the needs of gifted students.

Not Applicable

 

If necessary, provide further explanation. (Required explanation if column selected was

Duquesne Elementary School provides educational programs for Pre-K through Grade 6 within the school district. Students in Grades 7-12 have the option of attending school in two neighboring districts per PA School Code Section 16-1607.1.

High School Level

Instructional Practices

Status

Structured grouping practices are used to meet student needs.

Not Applicable

Flexible instructional time or other schedule-related practices are used to meet student needs.

Not Applicable

Differentiated instruction is used to meet student needs.

Not Applicable

A variety of practices that may include structured grouping, flexible scheduling and differentiated instruction are used to meet the needs of gifted students.

Not Applicable

 

If necessary, provide further explanation. (Required explanation if column selected was

Duquesne Elementary School provides educational programs for Pre-K through Grade 6 within the school district. Students in Grades 7-12 have the option of attending school in two neighboring districts per PA School Code Section 16-1607.1.

Recruitment

Describe the process you implement to recruit and assign the most effective and highly qualified teachers in order to meet the learning needs of students who are below proficiency or are at risk of not graduating.

The district assures that the teaching staff is highly qualified by carefully monitoring professional development, certification, and advanced degrees. Many candidates and subsequent hires are dually/or multiple certified. Work experience in similar districts is preferred.  It is also important that the staff has the ability and willingness to work with the community and families, as well as the students.  Individual Learning Plans (ILPs) are written for every student who does not have an Individualized Education Plan (IEP). Data is used to drive decision making along with formative and benchmark assessments.  Instructional Coaches assist teachers to ensure that they provide the support that is needed regardless of the grade level or need of the student.  
 

Assessments

Local Graduation Requirements

Course Completion

SY 16/17

SY 17/18

SY 18/19

Total Courses

0.00

0.00

0.00

English

0.00

0.00

0.00

Mathematics

0.00

0.00

0.00

Social Studies

0.00

0.00

0.00

Science

0.00

0.00

0.00

Physical Education

0.00

0.00

0.00

Health

0.00

0.00

0.00

Music, Art, Family & Consumer Sciences, Career and Technical Education

0.00

0.00

0.00

Electives

0.00

0.00

0.00

Minimum % Grade Required for Credit (Numerical Answer)

0.00

0.00

0.00

 

Graduation Requirement Specifics

·      We affirm that our entity requires demonstration of proficiency or above in each of the following State academic standards: English Language Arts and Mathematics, Science and Technology and Environment and Ecology, as determined through any one or a combination of the following:Not Applicable.  Our LEA does not offer High School courses.

Local Assessments

Standards

WA

TD

NAT

DA

PSW

Other

Arts and Humanities

 

 

 

 

 

 

Career Education and Work

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civics and Government

 

 

 

 

 

 

PA Core Standards: English Language Arts

 

 

 

 

 

 

PA Core Standards: Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects

 

 

 

 

 

 

PA Core Standards: Mathematics

 

 

 

 

 

 

Economics

 

 

 

 

 

 

Environment and Ecology

 

 

 

 

 

 

Family and Consumer Sciences

 

 

 

 

 

 

Geography

 

 

 

 

 

 

Health, Safety and Physical Education

 

 

 

 

 

 

History

 

 

 

 

 

 

Science and Technology and Engineering Education

 

 

 

 

 

 

World Language

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Methods and Measures

Summative Assessments

Summative Assessments

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

PSSA

 

X

 

 

 

Benchmark Assessments

Benchmark Assessments

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

Study Island

 

X

 

 

 

Formative Assessments

Formative Assessments

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

Quick Checks

X

X

 

 

Progress Monitoring

X

X

 

 

Writing Samples/Portfolios

X

X

 

 

Think Pair Share

X

X

 

 

White Boards/Clickers

X

X

 

 

Exit Slips

X

X

 

 

Mid Chapter Checkpoints; End of Chapter tests; Mid Year checks; End of Year Assessments

X

X

 

 

 

Diagnostic Assessments

Diagnostic Assessments

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

G-MADE

X

 

 

 

G-RADE

X

 

 

 

 

Validation of Implemented Assessments

Validation Methods

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

External Review

 

 

 

 

Intermediate Unit Review

 

 

 

 

LEA Administration Review

 

 

 

 

Building Supervisor Review

X

X

 

 

Department Supervisor Review

 

 

 

 

Professional Learning Community Review

X

X

 

 

Instructional Coach Review

X

X

 

 

Teacher Peer Review

X

X

 

 

 

Provide brief explanation of your process for reviewing assessments.

Grade level data meetings are held twice monthly. Data from summative, formative, diagnostic, and benchmark assessments are used to assign students into "needs based" groups for flex time periods. Teachers, coaches and administrators are involved in the data meetings. All staff monitor student progress and collect additional informational data as skills are presented and supported.

Development and Validation of Local Assessments

If applicable, explain your procedures for developing locally administered assessments and how they are independently and objectively validated every six years.

The District currently utilizes the local assessments provided within the recently purchased materials for ELA and math, Journeys and GO! Math (2014). These are aligned to the PA Common Core, and have been mapped using Pennsylvania Instructional Framework.

Collection and Dissemination

Describe your system to collect, analyze and disseminate assessment data efficiently and effectively for use by LEA leaders and instructional teams.

Life-long, grade specific data sheets have been created by the Instructional coaches that show all 4-Sight, Study Island, and PSSA data from the time a student enters the Duquesne Elementary School. OnHands stores all student data in their data base. Go!Math mid-chapter, end of chapter, mid year and end of the year spreadsheets are available on the district's common drive to keep track of these assessments. Weekly data meetings will continue to analyze data throughout the school year. 

Data Informed Instruction

Describe how information from the assessments is used to assist students who have not demonstrated achievement of the academic standards at a proficient level or higher.

A Flex time period has been built into the daily schedule to help students improve specific academic areas. Students may also attend the Boys' and Girls' Club and Extended Day Program (EDP) for additional tutoring. SPARK, a push in program through Duquesne University, works with students who are performing below proficient on reading skills. Individual Learning Plans, ILPs, are created to monitor student progress and help them to achieve proficiency. 

Assessment Data Uses

Assessment Data Uses

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

Assessment results are reported out by PA assessment anchor or standards-aligned learning objective.

X

X

 

 

Instructional practices are identified that are linked to student success in mastering specific PA assessment anchors, eligible content or standards-aligned learning objectives.

X

X

 

 

Specific PA assessment anchors, eligible content or standards-aligned learning objectives are identified for those students who did not demonstrate sufficient mastery so that teachers can collaboratively create and/or identify instructional strategies likely to increase mastery.

X

X

 

 

Instructional practices modified or adapted to increase student mastery.

X

X

 

 

 

Provide brief explanation of the process for incorporating selected strategies.

OnHands/EdInsight provides assessment results which can be broken down into achors and eligible content. New textbooks are aligned to the PA Core Standards. ILPs are written for individual students. Tutoring is provided after school. 

 

Provide brief explanation for strategies not selected and how you plan to address their incorporation.

There are no strategies that were not selected.

Distribution of Summative Assessment Results

Distribution Methods

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

Course Planning Guides

 

 

 

 

Directing Public to the PDE & other Test-related Websites

X

X

 

 

Individual Meetings

X

X

 

 

Letters to Parents/Guardians

X

X

 

 

Local Media Reports

 

 

 

 

Website

X

X

 

 

Meetings with Community, Families and School Board

X

X

 

 

Mass Phone Calls/Emails/Letters

X

X

 

 

Newsletters

X

X

 

 

Press Releases

X

X

 

 

School Calendar

X

X

 

 

Student Handbook

X

X

 

 

 

Provide brief explanation of the process for incorporating selected strategies.

The district regularly uses the redesigned website, One Call, What's Up Wednesday notices, Dinner and a Movie nights, Twitter, Facebook, and direct mail as well as Classroom Dojo to disseminate information. Activities and information can also be found in the newly created "Parent Room", as well as on multiple, strategically placed bulletin boards which contain updated hard copies of information.When parents participate in any school events, assessments schedules and results are addressed in discussions. 

 

Provide brief explanation for strategies not selected and how the LEA plans to address their incorporation.

Course planning guides do not address our grade levels. Local media reports are handled through the local intermediate unit. 

Safe and Supportive Schools

Assisting Struggling Schools

Describe your entity’s process for assisting schools that either do not meet the annual student achievement targets or experience other challenges, which deter student attainment of academic standards at a proficient level or higher.

If your entity has no struggling schools, explain how you will demonstrate continued growth in student achievement.

The district supports one elementary school, PreK through grade 6.  The elementary school is a Phase 1, Title I, Priority School and as such, is charged with addressing each of PDE's seven principles. These seven principles were adopted by the district as a condition of receiving Title I (SIG 1003g) funds to implement the Elementary School's Turnaround Model. The district agreed to "ensure that the principal is enabled to serve as a strong instruction leader who, in partnership with the school community leads achievement growth and continuous improvement within the school."  A requirement of this model is to support the elementary school principal by "providing the principal with operational flexibility in the areas of scheduling, staff, curriculum and budget." District administrators ensure that the school identifies effective research and evidence-based programs, implements effective instructional programs, and evaluates programs for effectiveness. The district provides assistance to the school's principal and the school-level administrative team to help identify opportunities to secure the resources and services they need to support their students, parents, and their families. This assistance has resulted in the addition of nearly $1.4m to fund school improvement goals.
 
 
 

Programs, Strategies and Actions

Programs, Strategies and Actions

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

Biennially Updated and Executed Memorandum of Understanding with Local Law Enforcement

X

X

 

 

School-wide Positive Behavioral Programs

X

X

 

 

Conflict Resolution or Dispute Management

X

X

 

 

Peer Helper Programs

X

X

 

 

Safety and Violence Prevention Curricula

X

X

 

 

Student Codes of Conduct

X

X

 

 

Comprehensive School Safety and Violence Prevention Plans

X

X

 

 

Purchase of Security-related Technology

X

X

 

 

Student, Staff and Visitor Identification Systems

X

X

 

 

Placement of School Resource Officers

X

X

 

 

Student Assistance Program Teams and Training

X

X

 

 

Counseling Services Available for all Students

X

X

 

 

Internet Web-based System for the Management of Student Discipline

X

X

 

 

 

Explanation of strategies not selected and how the LEA plans to address their incorporation:

All strategies have been selected in accordance with the Safe Schools Assurances.

Identifying and Programming for Gifted Students

  1. Describe your entity's process for identifying gifted children.
  2. Describe your gifted special education programs offered.

Chapter 16 Procedures, Identification and Timelines: 

 
Step 1:   Refer for Gifted Multidisciplinary Evaluation (GMDE)
As per PDE Gifted Guidelines, August 2010, referral for GMDE should be made when:
A.    Teacher or parent believes the student to be gifted;
B.    Student is not receiving appropriate education under Chapter 4 (related to academic standards and assessment); and
C.    One of the following apply:
             1.   GMDE is Requested:

Parent requests a Gifted Multidisciplinary Evaluation (GMDE) in Writing (22 Pa. Code §16.22(c))

o   Parents may request a GMDE at any time, with a limit of one request per school term

o   “If a request is made orally to any professional employee or administrator of the school district, that individual shall provide a copy of the permission to evaluate form to the parents within 10 calendar days of the oral request”

2.   GMDE is Indicated:

              o  District’s Student Search and Student Screening Processes indicate that the student should be evaluated (22 Pa. Code §16.21(a))

              o  Teacher referral initiates Student Screening Process, and Student Search data also indicate that the student should be evaluated (22 Pa. Code §16.22(b)2)

3.   GMDE is Ordered:

     A hearing officer or judicial decision orders a GMDE (22 Pa. Code §16.22(b)3)
Step 2:   Issue Permission to Evaluate and Notice of Parental Rights
               Permission to Evaluate (PTE) is sent to the parent along with Notice of Parental Rights (22 Pa. Code §16.61(a)1,(d)4). This should be done upon receipt of a written request to evaluate from the parents. 
 
Step 3:   Complete the Entire GMDE Process: 60 Calendar Days
               “The initial evaluation shall be completed and a copy of the evaluation report presented to the parents no later than 60 calendar days after the agency receives written parental consent for evaluation or receives an order of a court or hearing officer to conduct a multidisciplinary evaluation (22 Pa. Code §16.22(j))”;
excluding calendar days during summer vacation.
A.    Gifted Multidisciplinary Team (GMDT) conducts the GMDE within 45 calendar days from the date that written parental consent for evaluation was received by school district

·      GMDT must include:

o   the student’s parents,

o   a certified school psychologist,

o   persons familiar with the student’s educational experience and performance

o   one or more of the student’s current teachers

o   persons trained in the appropriate evaluation techniques

o   person familiar with the student’s cultural background when possible

§  A single member of the GMDT may meet two or more of the qualifications specified above (22 Pa. Code §16.22(d))

·       GMDT determines whether the student is a gifted student (22 Pa. Code §16.22 (i))

 
B.    Gifted Written Report (GWR) is compiled by GMDT based on the outcome of the GMDE and must be completed within 10 calendar days after the completion of the GMDE. Per 22 Pa. Code §16.22(h), the GWR must:
                     o   make a determination as to whether the student is gifted and in need of specially designed instruction

o   indicate the basis for such determination

o   include recommendations for the student’s programming

o   indicate the names and positions of the members of the GMDT
C.    GWR shall be copied and delivered to parents of the student within 5 days after its completion.
 
Step 4:   Issue Invitation to Gifted Individual Education Plan (GIEP) meeting: 10 calendar days before the GIEP meeting
·       Invitation to Participate in the GIEP meeting must be sent to the parents at least ten (10) calendar days in advance of the GIEP meeting. (22 Pa Code §16.32(c)(1)-(6))
·       To ensure parents of the student are offered the opportunity to be present at each GIEP team meeting, the following measures will be taken, as deemed appropriate by the team:

o   Documented phone calls

o   Letters

o   Certified letters with return receipts
·       Documentation of efforts to encourage parents to attend must be maintained (22 Pa Code §16.32(c))
 
Step 5:   Convene GIEP Team: within 30 calendar days after issuance of the GWR
·       GIEP Team must include persons who meet the following qualifications as per 22 Pa Code §16.32(c)(1-6)):

o   One or both of the student’s parents

o   The student, if the parent(s) choose to have the student participate

o   A representative of the district who serves as the chairperson of the GIEP team, is knowledgeable about the availability of resources of the district and is authorized by the district to commit those resources

o   One or more of the student’s current teachers

o   Other individuals at the discretion of either the parents or the district

o   A teacher of the gifted
·       GIEP Team must be convened:

o   Following an evaluation

o   At least annually (more if necessary) to review the GIEP of each gifted student (22 Pa Code §16.32(g)(3))

o   Following a reevaluation

o   At the request of a GIEP team member, parent, student, or school district (22 Pa Code §16.32(g)(4))
·       At the GIEP Team meeting, results and recommendations of the GMDE are discussed and the GWR, including the GMDT’s determination of whether the student is a gifted student, is reviewed

o   If the student is determined by the GMDT to be gifted and in need of specially designed instruction, a GIEP will be developed at the GIEP meeting.

o   If the GMDT has determined criteria for mentally gifted have not been met or the student does not need gifted education, a Notice of Recommended Assignment (NORA) is issued documenting such decision.
 
Step 6:      Issue Notice of Recommended Assignment (NORA): at GIEP meeting or within 5 calendar days after meeting
A NORA must be presented to parent(s) either:

o   in person at the GIEP meeting

o   or by certified mail within 5 calendar days after the completion of the GIEP meeting. (22 Pa Code §16.62(4))
 
Step 7:      Parent Approval: 10 calendar days by mail/5 days in person
·       Parents have 10 calendar days to respond to a NORA sent by mail
·       Parents have 5 calendar days to respond to a NORA presented in person at the GIEP meeting
·       If the parents receive the NORA in person and approve the recommended assignment within 5 calendar days, the district may not implement the GIEP for at least 5 calendar days, to give the parents an opportunity to notify the district within the five-day period of a decision to revoke the previous approval of the recommended assignment (22 Pa Code §16.62(5))
 
Step 8:      Develop GIEP within 30 calendar days after the issuance of a GMDT’s written report.*
                   The GIEP must be developed no more than 30 calendar days after GWR is issued (22 Pa Code §16.32(g)(1)).
* This is why the GIEP Team meeting must be scheduled within 30 days after the GWR is distributed.
 
Step 9:      Implement GIEP within 10 school days
                   The GIEP must be implemented no more than 10 school days after it is signed or the start of the following school year if the GIEP was completed fewer than 30 days before the last school day of the year (22 Pa Code §16.32(g)(2)) 
 
Gifted Programs:
  The District has offered preparation for and participation in local Gifted competitions, as well as accelerated work, cybercourse opportunities, and other opportunities as they relate to the individual student's needs for a supported, enrichment program.  To date, there are no students identified as Gifted/Chapter 16 attending the Duquesne Elementary School.   
 
 

Developmental Services

Developmental Services

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

Academic Counseling

X

X

 

 

Attendance Monitoring

X

X

 

 

Behavior Management Programs

X

X

 

 

Bullying Prevention

X

X

 

 

Career Awareness

X

X

 

 

Career Development/Planning

X

X

 

 

Coaching/Mentoring

X

X

 

 

Compliance with Health Requirements –i.e., Immunization

X

X

 

 

Emergency and Disaster Preparedness

X

X

 

 

Guidance Curriculum

X

X

 

 

Health and Wellness Curriculum

X

X

 

 

Health Screenings

X

X

 

 

Individual Student Planning

X

X

 

 

Nutrition

X

X

 

 

Orientation/Transition

X

X

 

 

RTII/MTSS

X

X

 

 

Wellness/Health Appraisal

X

X

 

 

 

Explanation of developmental services:

Additional programs include Olweus Bullying Prevention and monthly themes focusing on bullying prevention. "Kids Cook" is operated through the local food bank, and provides hands-on meal preparation and nutritional information to students. The Student Assistance Program (SAP) provides a process whereby academic, behavior, mental health, attendance and community/family resources can be accessed and utilized under the umbrella of the Student Services Program. 

Diagnostic, Intervention and Referral Services

Diagnostic, Intervention and Referral Services

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

Accommodations and Modifications

X

X

 

 

Administration of Medication

 

 

 

 

Assessment of Academic Skills/Aptitude for Learning

X

X

 

 

Assessment/Progress Monitoring

X

X

 

 

Casework

 

 

 

 

Crisis Response/Management/Intervention

X

X

 

 

Individual Counseling

X

X

 

 

Intervention for Actual or Potential Health Problems

X

X

 

 

Placement into Appropriate Programs

X

X

 

 

Small Group Counseling-Coping with life situations

X

X

 

 

Small Group Counseling-Educational planning

 

 

 

 

Small Group Counseling-Personal and Social Development

X

X

 

 

Special Education Evaluation

X

X

 

 

Student Assistance Program

X

X

 

 

 

Explanation of diagnostic, intervention and referral services:

Through the umbrella of  Student Services and Chapter 12, students are afforded the opportunity to participate in many on-site, small group sessions focusing around the areas of making friends, social skills, dealing with grief, and making good choices. Academic coaches provide support to the teachers with the implementation of new programs (ELA and Math, recently); data collection for Individual Learning Plans (ILPs), and data sharing to more effectively support student growth in learning. Flex time is incorporated into the daily schedule to hone skills based onstudent need within the three Tiers (RTiI & MTSS). Progress monitoring collected through flex time and based on the ILPs serves to identify what interventions have been successful, which ones need to be revisitied, and which students we may want to consider for further evaluation. 

Consultation and Coordination Services

Consultation and Coordination Services

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

Alternative Education

 

 

 

 

Case and Care Management

X

X

 

 

Community Liaison

X

X

 

 

Community Services Coordination (Internal or External)

X

X

 

 

Coordinate Plans

 

 

 

 

Coordination with Families (Learning or Behavioral)

X

X

 

 

Home/Family Communication

X

X

 

 

Managing Chronic Health Problems

X

X

 

 

Managing IEP and 504 Plans

X

X

 

 

Referral to Community Agencies

X

X

 

 

Staff Development

X

X

 

 

Strengthening Relationships  Between School Personnel, Parents and Communities

X

X

 

 

System Support

X

X

 

 

Truancy Coordination

X

X

 

 

Attendance monitoring

X

X

 

 

 

Explanation of consultation and coordination services:

Chapter 12 affords the district many avenues with which to secure supports for families. We work with McKinny-Vento, local food banks and housing agencies, countywide supports, mental health supports and coordination of services as needed by the families in the community. The district operates informational evening gatherings for the families. Staff developemnt is ongoing, and weekly addresses the topics of academics, behavior, and attendance. 

Communication of Educational Opportunities

Communication of Educational Opportunities

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

Course Planning Guides

 

 

 

 

Directing Public to the PDE & Test-related Websites

X

X

 

 

Individual Meetings

X

X

 

 

Letters to Parents/Guardians

X

X

 

 

Local Media Reports

 

 

 

 

Website

X

X

 

 

Meetings with Community, Families and Board of Directors

X

X

 

 

Mass Phone Calls/Emails/Letters

X

X

 

 

Newsletters

X

X

 

 

Press Releases

 

 

 

 

School Calendar

X

X

 

 

Student Handbook

X

X

 

 

 

Communication of Student Health Needs

Communication of Student Health Needs

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

Individual Meetings

X

X

 

 

Individual Screening Results

X

X

 

 

Letters to Parents/Guardians 

X

X

 

 

Website

X

X

 

 

Meetings with Community, Families and Board of Directors

X

X

 

 

Newsletters

X

X

 

 

School Calendar

X

X

 

 

Student Handbook

X

X

 

 

 

Frequency of Communication

Elementary Education - Primary Level

·      More than once a month

Elementary Education - Intermediate Level

·      More than once a month

Middle Level

·      Not Applicable

High School Level

·      Not Applicable

Collaboration for Interventions

Describe the collaboration between classroom teachers and individuals providing interventions regarding differing student needs and academic progress.

 
There are multiple levels of staff collaboration to support students' academic progress and social/behavioral needs including: faculty meetings held twice monthly; weekly grade specific ELA and Math professional development sessions led by the Instructional Coaches; twice monthly data-focused grade level meetings; daily push-in support from four Instruction Coaches (2 ELA and 2 math); teachers serve as tutors in the extended day/year programs; and teachers and administrators work on the Curriculum Steering Committee and Individual Learning Plan (students) Committee. The school-level student support team pushes into classrooms with social and behavioral lessons.

Community Coordination

Describe how you accomplish coordination with community operated infant and toddler centers, as well as preschool early intervention programs. In addition, describe the community coordination with the following before or after school programs and services for all grade levels, including pre-kindergarten, if offered, through grade 12.

  1. Child care
  2. After school programs
  3. Youth workforce development programs
  4. Tutoring

The district supports early childhood intervention programs such as Head Start, and DART. DART is operated by the Allegheny Intermediate Unit with several on-site classrooms, one classroom located in an apartment's community center, and several other off-site classrooms. The district provides transportation to sites where walking with a parent is not possible. Transportation is also provided to local day care centers for those students who attend off-site afterschool programs.
The district funds an extended day program and an extended year program. Prior to October 2015, the district partnered with the Boys and Girls Club of Western Pennsylvania to run the extended day and year programs.  This partnership linked together funding from the Club's 21st Century Community Learning Centers' afterschool program with the District's Title I School Improvement Grant and the county's food program to provide a comprehensive academic, social, and enrichment program for students Pre-K through Grade 6. Recently the Club lost its funding jeopardizing the program's continuation. The district stepped in to fully fund both the extended day and extended year programs in its commitment to the community. The programs include academic remediation and enrichment, arts, music, social development, team building activities, and healthy living lessons. 
The elementary school has an approved kindergarten transition plan that outlines the coordination of early childhood learning opportunities with the school including events such as Kindergarten Open House and invitations to the elementary school's Family Fun Nights.  Elementary school staff meet regularly with preschool agency staff to plan activities that transition families into the kindergarten setting.  Beginning with the 2014-15 school year, the district operates a four-year-old preschool program. This year, the program was expanded to two full time classrooms.  The program is fully integrated into the elementary school's program. Preliminary data indicates that our first transition class, with 100% retention rate in the district, are well-prepared and school ready for the expectations of kindergarten.

Preschool Agency Coordination

Explain how the LEA coordinates with agencies that serve preschool age children with disabilities.

  1. Address coordination activities designed to identify and serve children with disabilities and the supports and accommodations available to ensure both physical and programmatic access.
  2. Address pre-kindergarten programs operated directly by the LEA and those operated by community agencies under contract from the LEA.
  3. Describe how the LEA provides for a smooth transition from the home setting and any early childhood care or educational setting the students attend, to the school setting.

As previously stated, the district works collaboratively with both Headstart and DART programs for early intervention (3-4 year old preschool programs). Transportation is provided when needed. Pre-school students receiving early intervention/special education services for hearing, speech, developmental delays, autism and other skill deficits as indicated on testing and screening protocols are invited to a team meeting prior to their transition to Kindergarten. Student information is shared with the district by the AIU/DART programs as parents indicate their intent to register in the district. An Open House/Early Registration program which includes parents, early intervention staff and district staff is held on school grounds. Explanations are provided with regard to the processes and procedures necessary to register students in the district, as well as what is necessary for supporting any parental concerns or identified delays. Parents who are ready to register their child can do so at that time with support from the central office,

 

The elementary school has an approved kindergarten transition plan developed in partnership with the Intermediate Unit and its preschool/Head Start team members.  The plan addresses communications, collaboration, and support navigating through the information highway. The district also operates two PreK classrooms, whose teachers and paraprofessionals work collaboratively with the "school age" staff. Students participate in all activities as their school aged counterparts do.

 

Students transitioning from early intervention home programs participate in team meetings at the district to discuss the needs of such students, and address their individual needs in a free and appropriate environment.

Materials and Resources

Description of Materials and Resources

Elementary Education-Primary Level

Material and Resources Characteristics

Status

Aligned and supportive of academic standards, progresses level to level and demonstrates relationships among fundamental concepts and skills

Accomplished

A robust supply of high quality aligned instructional materials and resources available

Accomplished

Accessibility for students and teachers is effective and efficient

Accomplished

Differentiated and equitably allocated to accommodate diverse levels of student motivation, performance and educational needs

Developing

 

Provide explanation for processes used to ensure Accomplishment.

The district is using two new programs to support the Pennsylvania Instructional Framework. These programs are Journeys (ELA) and GO Math. Both programs are aligned to the PA core standards, provide tier support, incorporate frequent assessments, and include 'whole reading' instruction. 

 

Explanation for any row checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent". How the LEA plans to address their incorporation:

There are no rows checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent".

Elementary Education-Intermediate Level

Material and Resources Characteristics

Status

Aligned and supportive of academic standards, progresses level to level and demonstrates relationships among fundamental concepts and skills

Accomplished

A robust supply of high quality aligned instructional materials and resources available

Accomplished

Accessibility for students and teachers is effective and efficient

Accomplished

Differentiated and equitably allocated to accommodate diverse levels of student motivation, performance and educational needs

Developing

 

Provide explanation for processes used to ensure Accomplishment.

The district is using two new programs to support the Pennsylvania Instructional Framework. These programs are Journeys (ELA) and GO Math. Both programs are aligned to the PA core standards, provide tier support, incorporate frequent assessments, and include 'whole reading' instruction.

 

Explanation for any row checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent". How the LEA plans to address their incorporation:

There are no rows checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent".

Middle Level

Material and Resources Characteristics

Status

Aligned and supportive of academic standards, progresses level to level and demonstrates relationships among fundamental concepts and skills

Non Existent

A robust supply of high quality aligned instructional materials and resources available

Non Existent

Accessibility for students and teachers is effective and efficient

Non Existent

Differentiated and equitably allocated to accommodate diverse levels of student motivation, performance and educational needs

Non Existent

 

Provide explanation for processes used to ensure Accomplishment.

Duquesne operates an elementary school.  Students at the Jr/Sr High School level attend East Allegheny and West Mifflin School Districts.

 

Explanation for any row checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent". How the LEA plans to address their incorporation:

Duquesne operates an elementary school.  Students at the Jr/Sr High School level attend East Allegheny and West Mifflin School Districts.

High School Level

Material and Resources Characteristics

Status

Aligned and supportive of academic standards, progresses level to level and demonstrates relationships among fundamental concepts and skills

Non Existent

A robust supply of high quality aligned instructional materials and resources available

Non Existent

Accessibility for students and teachers is effective and efficient

Non Existent

Differentiated and equitably allocated to accommodate diverse levels of student motivation, performance and educational needs

Non Existent

 

Provide explanation for processes used to ensure Accomplishment.

Duquesne operates an elementary school.  Students at the Jr/Sr High School level attend East Allegheny and West Mifflin School Districts.

 

Explanation for any row checked "Needs Improvement" or "Non Existent". How the LEA plans to address their incorporation:

Duquesne operates an elementary school.  Students at the Jr/Sr High School level attend East Allegheny and West Mifflin School Districts.

SAS Incorporation

Elementary Education-Primary Level

Standards

Status

Arts and Humanities

Not Applicable

Career Education and Work

Not Applicable

Civics and Government

Not Applicable

PA Core Standards: English Language Arts

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

PA Core Standards: Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects

Not Applicable

PA Core Standards: Mathematics

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Economics

Not Applicable

Environment and Ecology

Not Applicable

Family and Consumer Sciences

Not Applicable

Geography

Not Applicable

Health, Safety and Physical Education

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

History

Not Applicable

Science and Technology and Engineering Education

Not Applicable

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Math

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Reading

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

American School Counselor Association for Students

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Early Childhood Education: Infant-Toddler→Second Grade

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

English Language Proficiency

Not Applicable

Interpersonal Skills

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

School Climate

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

 

Further explanation for columns selected "

The district currently uses SAS for core subjects. Not all teachers are accessing the various components with fidelity.

Elementary Education-Intermediate Level

Standards

Status

Arts and Humanities

Not Applicable

Career Education and Work

Not Applicable

Civics and Government

Not Applicable

PA Core Standards: English Language Arts

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

PA Core Standards: Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

PA Core Standards: Mathematics

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Economics

Not Applicable

Environment and Ecology

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Family and Consumer Sciences

Not Applicable

Geography

Not Applicable

Health, Safety and Physical Education

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

History

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Science and Technology and Engineering Education

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Math

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Reading

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

American School Counselor Association for Students

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

English Language Proficiency

Not Applicable

Interpersonal Skills

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

School Climate

Implemented in 50% or more of district classrooms

 

Further explanation for columns selected "

The district currently uses SAS for core subjects. Not all teachers are accessing the various components with fidelity.

Middle Level

Standards

Status

Arts and Humanities

Not Applicable

Career Education and Work

Not Applicable

Civics and Government

Not Applicable

PA Core Standards: English Language Arts

Not Applicable

PA Core Standards: Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects

Not Applicable

PA Core Standards: Mathematics

Not Applicable

Economics

Not Applicable

Environment and Ecology

Not Applicable

Family and Consumer Sciences

Not Applicable

Geography

Not Applicable

Health, Safety and Physical Education

Not Applicable

History

Not Applicable

Science and Technology and Engineering Education

Not Applicable

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Math

Not Applicable

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Reading

Not Applicable

American School Counselor Association for Students

Not Applicable

English Language Proficiency

Not Applicable

Interpersonal Skills

Not Applicable

School Climate

Not Applicable

World Language

Not Applicable

 

Further explanation for columns selected "

The district does not currently operate a middle school.

High School Level

Standards

Status

Arts and Humanities

Not Applicable

Career Education and Work

Not Applicable

Civics and Government

Not Applicable

PA Core Standards: English Language Arts

Not Applicable

PA Core Standards: Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects

Not Applicable

PA Core Standards: Mathematics

Not Applicable

Economics

Not Applicable

Environment and Ecology

Not Applicable

Family and Consumer Sciences

Not Applicable

Geography

Not Applicable

Health, Safety and Physical Education

Not Applicable

History

Not Applicable

Science and Technology and Engineering Education

Not Applicable

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Math

Not Applicable

Alternate Academic Content Standards for Reading

Not Applicable

American School Counselor Association for Students

Not Applicable

English Language Proficiency

Not Applicable

Interpersonal Skills

Not Applicable

School Climate

Not Applicable

World Language

Not Applicable

 

Further explanation for columns selected "

The district does not currently operate a high school.

Professional Education

Characteristics

District’s Professional Education Characteristics

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

Enhances the educator’s content knowledge in the area of the educator’s certification or assignment.

X

X

 

 

Increases the educator’s teaching skills based on effective practice research, with attention given to interventions for struggling students.

X

X

 

 

Increases the educator's teaching skills based on effective practice research, with attention given to interventions for gifted students.

X

X

 

 

Provides educators with a variety of classroom-based assessment skills and the skills needed to analyze and use data in instructional decision making.

X

X

 

 

Empowers educators to work effectively with parents and community partners.

X

X

 

 

 

District’s Professional Education Characteristics

EEP

EEI

ML

HS

Provides the knowledge and skills to think and plan strategically, ensuring that assessments, curriculum, instruction, staff professional education, teaching materials and interventions for struggling students are aligned to each other, as well as to Pennsylvania’s academic standards.

X

X

 

 

Provides the knowledge and skills to think and plan strategically, ensuring that assessments, curriculum, instruction, staff professional education, teaching materials and interventions for gifted students are aligned to each other, as well as to Pennsylvania's academic standards.

X

X

 

 

Provides leaders with the ability to access and use appropriate data to inform decision making.

X

X

 

 

Empowers leaders to create a culture of teaching and learning, with an emphasis on learning.

X

X

 

 

Instructs the leader in managing resources for effective results.

X

X

 

 

 

Provide brief explanation of your process for ensuring these selected characteristics.

The building administrators are actively participating in NISL training for PIL hours.

 

Provide brief explanation for strategies not selected and how you plan to address their incorporation.

All strategies are to be incorporated. 

Educator Discipline Act 126, 71

Provides educators with mandated reporter training, totaling 3 hours, every 5 years as outlined in Act 126.

Questions

The LEA has conducted the required training on:

11/1/2013 Group A 3 hours initial training

12/1/2013 Group B 3 hours initial training

 

Provides educators with four (4) hours of professional development in youth suicide awareness and prevention every five (5) years for professional educators in grades six through twelve as outlined in Act 71.

Questions

The LEA plans to conduct the training on approximately:

10/30/2015 training is scheduled during in-service; independent or on-line

 

Provides educators with four (4) hours of professional development every five (5) years for professional educators that are teaching the curriculum in which the Child Exploitation Awareness Education program is incorporated as outlined in Act 71.

Questions

Not Applicable for our school entity

 

Strategies Ensuring Fidelity

·      Professional Development activities are based upon detailed needs assessments that utilize student assessment results to target instructional areas that need strengthening.

·      Using disaggregated student data to determine educators’ learning priorities.

·      Professional Development activities are based upon detailed needs assessments that utilize student assessment results to target curricular areas that need further alignment.

·      Professional Development activities are developed that support implementation of strategies identified in your action plan.

·      Clear expectations in terms of teacher practice are identified for staff implementation.

·      An implementation evaluation is created, based upon specific expectations related to changes in teacher practice, which is used to validate the overall effectiveness of the professional development initiative.

·      The LEA has a systemic process that is used to validate whether or not providers have the capacity to present quality professional development.

·      Administrators participate fully in all professional development sessions targeted for their faculties.

·      Every Professional development initiative includes components that provide ongoing support to teachers regarding implementation.

·      The LEA has an ongoing monitoring system in place (i.e. walkthroughs, classroom observations).

·      Professional Education is evaluated to show its impact on teaching practices and student learning.

Provide brief explanation of your process for ensuring these selected characteristics.

Teachers receive professional development on ELA and Math strategies at least four times per month for a total of two hours per month. Professional staff also receive at a minimum 30 minutes of technology training per month.The district also makes use of a Steering Committee which meets regularly to access and track student successes and needs with regard to curriculum. Teachers also have 8 inservice days where high quality Professional Development occurs.The Admin team conducts regular walkthroughs to observe the implementation of programming used in the school.The steering committee analyzes teacher and student proficiency to design and/or select appropriate and pertinent professional development.

 

Provide brief explanation for strategies not selected and how you plan to address their incorporation.

As new strategies and information become available, additional professional development will be focused on incorporating trainings and supporting these techniques in the classroom. 

Induction Program

  • Inductees will know, understand and implement instructional practices validated by the LEA as known to improve student achievement.
  • Inductees will assign challenging work to diverse student populations.
  • Inductees will know the basic details and expectations related to LEA-wide initiatives, practices, policies and procedures.
  • Inductees will know the basic details and expectations related to school initiatives, practices and procedures.
  • Inductees will be able to access state curriculum frameworks and focus lesson design on leading students to mastery of all state academic standards, assessment anchors and  eligible content (where appropriate) identified in the LEA's curricula.
  • Inductees will effectively navigate the Standards Aligned System website.
  • Inductees will know and apply LEA endorsed classroom management strategies.
  • Inductees will know and utilize school/LEA resources that are available to assist students in crisis.
  • Inductees will take advantage of opportunities to engage personally with other members of the faculty in order to develop a sense of collegiality and camaraderie.

Provide brief explanation of your process for ensuring these selected characteristics.

A revised Induction Plan was created for the 2015-16 school year that closely follows the Teacher Effectiveness Model. It highlights the above components. A mentor is assigned to each new professional staff member to assist with understanding and implementation of these competencies.

 

Provide brief explanation for strategies not selected and how you plan to address their incorporation.

Any new or additional strategies will be addressed in a timely manner. 

Needs of Inductees

  • Frequent observations of inductee instructional practice by a coach or mentor to identify needs.
  • Frequent observations of inductee instructional practice by supervisor to identify needs.
  • Regular meetings with mentors or coaches to reflect upon instructional practice to identify needs.
  • Student PSSA data.
  • Standardized student assessment data other than the PSSA.
  • Classroom assessment data (Formative & Summative).
  • Inductee survey (local, intermediate units and national level).
  • Review of inductee lesson plans.
  • Review of written reports summarizing instructional activity.
  • Submission of inductee portfolio.
  • Knowledge of successful research-based instructional models.
  • Information collected from previous induction programs (e.g., program evaluations and second-year teacher interviews).

Provide brief explanation of your process for ensuring these selected characteristics.

Multiple surveys are conducted during the school year to determine teacher need. Walkthrough data and observations assist in determining teacher supports.The mentor program reflects those components outlined in the Teacher Effectiveness system.

 

Provide brief explanation for strategies not selected and you plan to address their incorporation.

All startegies were selected to assess the needs of the inductees.

Mentor Characteristics

·      Pool of possible mentors is comprised of teachers with outstanding work performance.

·      Potential mentors have similar certifications and assignments.

·      Potential mentors must model continuous learning and reflection.

·      Potential mentors must have knowledge of LEA policies, procedures and resources.

·      Potential mentors must have demonstrated ability to work effectively with students and other adults.

·      Potential mentors must be willing to accept additional responsibility.

·      Mentors must complete mentor training or have previous related experience (e.g., purpose of induction program and role of mentor, communication and listening skills, coaching and conferencing skills, problem-solving skills and knowledge of adult learning and development).

·      Mentors and inductees must have compatible schedules so that they can meet regularly.

Provide brief explanation of your process for ensuring these selected characteristics.

When mentor teachers are needed for the Induction of new employees, the district will place an internal post seeking candidates from within the bargaining unit. Mentors are selected and matched with new employees based upon career experiences and certifications. Mentors are willing to support new staff and are eager to explore new strategies and educational techniques. 

 

Provide brief explanation for characteristics not selected and how you plan to address their incorporation.

All characteristics are selected and incorporated in the mentor/mentee relationship.

Induction Program Timeline

Topics

Aug-Sep

Oct-Nov

Dec-Jan

Feb-Mar

Apr-May

Jun-Jul

Code of Professional Practice and Conduct for Educators

X

X

 

 

 

 

Assessments

X

 

X

 

X

 

Best Instructional Practices

X

X

X

X

X

 

Safe and Supportive Schools

X

X

X

X

X

 

Standards

X

X

 

 

 

 

Curriculum

X

X

 

 

 

 

Instruction

X

X

X

X

X

 

Accommodations and Adaptations for diverse learners

X

X

X

X

X

 

Data informed decision making

X

X

X

X

X

 

Materials and Resources for Instruction

X

X

 

X

X

 

 

If necessary, provide further explanation.

Many of the above topics are on-going, and may also be provided on an "as needed" or individual need basis.

Monitoring Evaluating and Induction Program

Identify the procedures for monitoring and evaluating the Induction program.

New staff meet with their mentor on a bi-weekly schedule to address the components and objectives within the induction program. Building adminitration will meet with mentors and inductees to assure that the program is implemented with fidelity.
Each inductee will complete a survey on the effectiveness of the induction program.  Each mentor will also complete a survey to identify successes of the induction program.
 
 

Recording Process

Identify the recording process for inductee participation and program completion. (Check all that apply)

  • Mentor documents his/her inductee's involvement in the program.
  • A designated administrator receives, evaluates and archives all mentor records.
  • School/LEA maintains accurate records of program completion and provide a certificate or statement of completion to each inductee who has completed the program.
  • LEA administrator receives, tallies, and archives all LEA mentor records.
  • Completion is verified by the LEA Chief Executive Officer on the Application for Level 2 Certification.

Special Education

Special Education Students

Total students identified: 98

Identification Method

Identify the District's method for identifying students with specific learning disabilities.

The Duquesne City School District has selected to use the Severe Discrepancy Model as the method for identifying students with Specific Learning Disabilities. Upon the receipt of the Permission to Evaluate-Consent form, students will be administered an individualized intelligence test and an individual academic achievement test to determine whether a severe discrepancy is evident. The presence of a discrepancy will be determined utilizing a comparison of the student's achievement expectancy given his or her intellectual ability, with severe discrepancy defined as 1.5 standard deviations below expectancy given his or her IQ. Severe discrepancy between ability and achievement  will also be examined at .65 using simple, not predicted, discrepancy analysis.
 
 

Enrollment

Review the Enrollment Difference Status. If necessary, describe how your district plans to address any significant disproportionalities.

The data is publicly available via the PennData website. You can view your most recent report. The link is: http://penndata.hbg.psu.edu/BSEReports

The Enrollment Difference Status is not significantly disproportionate in accordance to race and ethnicity.
The Enrollment Difference Status does differ in multiple disability categories which can be accounted for, across the board with several overarching rationale. These rationale include, but are not limited to: 1) a much smaller enrollment number than the state sample. Duquesne is the smallest of all of the districts in the Commonwealth, so even one student identified in a particular category can toss our percentages upwards 2) A transient population: many of our students are "boomerang" students. They may leave our district as general education students, and then a year later they return as special needs 3) Our 'out of state'/transfer students rarely arrive in Duquesne with current data, and with multiple concerns 4) Duquesne's low cost housing and community supports attract large families, often of whom have multiple disabilities within that family 5) High number of parent requests for testing in the early grades (K-3) 5) High number of students transitioning to School Age programs from Head Start /Early Intervention programs
The LEA is currently supporting a 30.2%
student enrollment in Special Education, compared to the state 15.4%
Autism                                     11.7%   State   9.4%  (Autism is one of the fastest rising categories due to early intervention, and better screening)
Emotional Disturbance        25.8%   State   8.4%  (Many of our instate and out of state transfers come with the ED eligibility. At Duquesne, we rule out all OHI/SLD possibilities before even considering ED)
Intellectual Disability            11.7%   State   6.7%   (We had a significant number of students transfer in to DCSD which is why we opened our own classroom)
Specific Learning Dis           24.2%   State   44.3%  (SLD is often a secondary disability category, and not used often with students with limited school experience, K-1)
Speech or Language           18.3%   State   15.8%
(Based upon "SE Data Report: At a Glance", December 1, 2013 Child Count)
 
The LEA is currently supporting a 28.0%
student enrollment in Special Education, compared to the state at 15.6% (decreased)
Autism                                     12.2%   State   9.9%  (slight increase; early intervention students)
Emotional Disturbance        21.4%   State   8.5%  (decrease)
Intellectual Disability            11.2%   State   6.6%  (decrease)
Specific Learning Dis           25.5%   State   43.3%  (increase - good)
Speech or Language           21.4%   State   15.4%  (increase)
(Based upon "SE Data Report: At a Glance", December 1, 2014 Child Count)

Non-Resident Students Oversight

  1. How does the District meet its obligation under Section 1306 of the Public School Code as the host District at each location?
  2. How does the District ensure that students are receiving a free appropriate public education (FAPE) in the least restrictive environment (LRE)?
  3. What problems or barriers exist which limit the District's ability to meet its obligations under Section 1306 of the Public School Code?

The Duquesne City School District currently has no students in the 1306 catchment. If a facility were to open, then the district would meet its responsibility per Child Find and FAPE. 
Students who transfer from other districts, and who have an IEP, are enrolled promptly, and within the state guidelines. The IEP team meets to determine whether or not the existing IEP can be supported in our school(s) or if a revision is necessary to best meet the student's needs. Appropriate placement options and revisions are discussed with the parent as part of the IEP team. Duquesne City School District accommodates parents to assist in their participation of the IEP team discussions and meeting. Additional support options in the areas of community needs and mental health can also be discussed during these meetings.
Barriers which exist include the lack of information provided to the school district, including difficulty in attaining educational records due to multiple placements within a single calendar year. We do have the assistance of Allegheny County Behavioral Health advisor who has been excellent in securing case managers and school histories for us. We are attempting to connect to the intercounty database, which should be fully operational by summer of 2015. We do not currently operate any facilities in the district.

Incarcerated Students Oversight

Describe the system of oversight the District would implement to ensure that all incarcerated students who may be eligible for special education are located, identified, evaluated and when deemed eligible, are offered a free appropriate public education (FAPE).

There are no facilities operating within the Duquesne City School District at this time. If a facility were to open, the district would meet its responsibility per FAPE and Child Find. Should a student be incarcerated within the district, the following procedure is in place. 
When the Superintendent's office is notified that a student has been incarcerated, the office forwards the PDE-4605, Determination of District Residence for Students in Facilities or Institutions in Accordance with Section 1306 of the school code, to the Director of Special Education for verification of the student's residence or the residence of the student's parent(s)/guardian(s). After the Director verifies the residence, the 4605 is returned to the Superintendent's office. The residence is then approved or denied. The Superintendent's office sends the form to the district that made the request and will be willing to provide a free, appropriate public education to the student.
The Director of Special Education contacts the facility or Institution in order to monitor or verify that the student is offered a free appropriate education. The Director provides the facility or Institution the name of the School District LEA and the office telephone number, along with pertinent special education documents to ensure the  continuity of educational services. The Director also contacts the student's parent/guardian to offer support.
The District tracks students who have been placed in a facility or Institution and collaborates with the facility or Institution in order to provide continuity of instruction as students transition between differing educational environments. Every effort is made, when notified of a student's return, to assist with the supportive services for a successful transition of the student back into the public education setting.
With the state decision to transfer our secondary students to their choice of East Allegheny or West Mifflin Area School Districts, our incarcerated students oversight responsibilities are transferred more each year to those districts (as our students age-out, graduate, or become secondary level students). 
 

Least Restrictive Environment

  1. Describe the District procedures, which ensure that, to the maximum extent appropriate, children with disabilities, including those in private institutions, are educated with non-disabled children, and that removal from the regular education environment only occurs when education in that setting with supplementary aids and services, cannot be achieved satisfactorily.
  2. Describe how the District is replicating successful programs, evidence-based models, and other PDE sponsored initiatives to enhance or expand the continuum of supports/services and education placement options available within the District to support students with disabilities access the general education curriculum in the least restrictive environment (LRE). (Provide information describing the manner in which the District utilizes site-based training, consultation and technical assistance opportunities available through PDE/PaTTAN, or other public or private agencies.)
  3. Refer to and discuss the SPP targets and the district's percentages in the Indicator 5 section - Educational Environments. Also discuss the number of students placed out of the district and how those placements were determined to assure that LRE requirements are met.

The Duquesne City School District through screening and evaluation procedures ensures that, to the maximum extent appropriate, children with disabilities, including those in private institutions, are educated with non-disabled children. Further, removal from the regular education environment only occurs when education in that setting with supplementary aids and services cannot be achieved satisfactorily. Supplementary aids and services may include physical, collaborative, instructional, social-behavioral, and/or outside agency supports depending upon the needs of the individual. PDE has a Fact Sheet which outlines specific examples within the framework for considering supplementary aids and services. All Special Educators in the DCSD have receive training, and have this information at hand. 
The Duquesne City School District screens students based upon both teacher and parent referrals. Prior to evaluation for special education services, students are assigned ability level reading groups which target their specific needs. The district makes use of quarterly testing and data driven decisions regarding delivery and instruction replete with regrouping to highlight changing needs. Components of the current reading series include intervention, reteaching, small group, and multiple modality evaluations where students who are not as successful may receive additional targeted supports.
Prior to referral for special education services, parents are also encouraged to give permission for students to participate in the Duquesne Student Assistance Program (DSAP). Community, mental health and academic supports are explored. Students also have the option of participating in focus groups, counseling, positive behavior support incentives, ability based reading groups. flex time, differentiated instruction, and exposure to various other strategies to meet their needs. 
After a parent makes a written request, the special education department gathers testing and classroom data, as well as any supportive data the student may have received prior to the parent making a request. Upon receipt of the Consent to Evaluate, which would have been sent out with the Prior Written Notice/Procedural Safeguards, testing is begun, and a formal evaluation based upon the student's areas of concern is conducted. The District has 60 days within which to complete this formal evaluation. The results are shared with the parent, the special education department will issue a Notice of Recommended Placement (NOREP), assign a staff member and schedule an IEP meeting within 30 days. Services will begin for a student who is eligible within ten days. 
The District's Data Collection system allows access to each student's strengths and needs. Databases include, but are not limited to, standardized test results, state assessments results, classroom assessment results, attendance, discipline data, student demographical information as well as Pennsylvania Value Added Assessment System (PVAAS). Data entered will be reviewed, analyzed, and modified as necessary.
The District utilizes data driven instruction in the classroom enabling teachers to base the education decisions on solid data rather than on assumption. They can make adjustments early to avoid continual student failure. The idea is based on the assumption that by consistently analyzing what we do, adjusting to get better, we will improve.
Student data is collected for students in grades PK4-6. These profiles are warehoused in computer databases and contain at least the following information:
Report Card Grades
Curriculum Based Measurements
Study Island
PSSA/PASA
PVAAS
The Duquesne City School District participates with PDE, the Allegheny Intermediate Unit, PaTTAN, Allegheny County Behavioral Health, Mon-Yough Counseling services, Student Assistance Programs, Non-violent Crisis Intervention as well as many other service providers who offer professional development  for staff on a regular basis. Students in need of a more restrictive educational setting are monitored by District Behavior Specialists or Director of Special Education, or both, to ensure FAPE is offered. Regular meetings, in additional to the annual IEP meetings, are held to discuss changes to students' programs which will best meet their needs, and support a transition back into public education from  both on and off-site programs.
The DCSD has made progress over the last few years in the SPP5 data area of Educational Environments, even though we are still behind the state percentages, based upon December 1 Child Counts for these years. LEA data is listed first, followed by state data.
                      Gen Ed 80%+                 Gen Ed <40%          SE in other settings
2012             33.6%  62.1%               <10%     8.9%           37.2%    5.0%             (All secondary students in placements in WMASD and EASD were on our Child Count)
2013             40.4%   62.4%              <10%      8.9%          27.2%   4.8%              (First year that ALL rising 7th graders were fully transitioned to WMASD or EASD, including out of district placements)
2014             36.2%   62.0%               11.7%    9.5%          21.3%   4.8%              (We continue to provide a continuum of services at the district level, bringing students back from APSs whenever possible)

Behavior Support Services

Provide a summary of the District policy on behavioral support services including, but not limited to, the school wide positive behavior supports (PBS). Describe training provided to staff in the use of positive behavior supports, de-escalation techniques and responses to behavior that may require immediate intervention. If the district also has School-Based Behavioral Health Services, please discuss it.

Upon the successful completion of our cyclical monitoring in December 2009, the Duquesne City School District made many positive changes to our school wide behavioral support services. The first of these includes the adoption of the Positive Behavior  Support Policy which is utilized to satisfy the requirements of  Chapter 14. Training was held for all stakeholders in the application and use of positive behavioral supports. These training were conducted by the Allegheny Intermediate Unit, PDE, Crisis Prevention Institute and PaTTAN.
The district conducts annual training and recertification, as well as training and certification for new hires, in the techniques associated with crisis prevention and de-escalation principles to all staff. These trainings are through qualified trainers of the Crisis Prevention Institute (CPI) in Non-violent Crisis Intervention (NCI). A specialized 'Crisis Team Training' is held annually to support the first-responder teams. Our first responders work especially closely to the Tier 3 students. Additional support services (ACBHS,RESOLVE, CACTIS, MH/MR, CYF, etc) work with this team to secure supports beyond the school day.
On-site activities as well as activities in conjunction with Auberle and the Pittsburgh Cultural District have been met with great enthusiasm and success. The Duquesne Student Assistance Program (DSAP) promotes educationally sound, scheduled supports throughout the day, as well as is responsible for the instituting of PATHS, Olweus, Life Skills, Emotional Regulation, Trauma and grief care, and Interventions strategies and curriculum. The Student Services Team supports parent involvement, classroom management, SAP conferences, assistance to students transitioning back into the public school setting as well as the support of new families to our district.
Duquesne's philosophy is one of supportive, not aversive, techniques in the instruction of the desired behavioral outcomes. Baseline discipline data has been established the first quarter, and will be collected each subsequent quarter to determine successes and areas of need. These areas of need will be addressed with appropriate interventions, and our successes will be celebrated. As an extremely small district, our issues tend to be magnified, but so are our supports.
Students who continue to behave in ways that may present as a danger to self or others and who are truly a safety risk, will be attended to by the crisis team. The crisis team has the ability to assess suicide risk, and other safety risks, and act accordingly with the appropriate authorities. Parent notification, and accurate documentation assist in the creation of functional behavioral assessments which allow us to pinpoint root cause, and develop behavior plans which are individualized and flexible.
Positive Behavior Supports  will continue to focus on research based interventions, positive practices and techniques, positive reinforcement - intrinsic and extrinsic, instruction in alternative or replacement behaviors, use of least intrusive interventions, counseling as deemed necessary, manifestation determination and subsequent positive behavior support plans which may encompass many of the afore mentioned supports.
Restraints are used as a last resort, when a student presents as a danger to the safety of self or others. Restraints are done only by the crisis team. Reports are filed in a timely fashion (24 hours) and recorded per the state system of restraint reporting(RISC). An IEP meeting is held within 10 days of the restraint, and modifications may be made to the student's IEP/PBSP or in serious situations, service setting.The parent may waive the IEP meeting. Documentation must be maintained. These are all in accordance with the Positive Behavior Support Policy approved by the District.

Intensive Interagency/Ensuring FAPE/Hard to Place Students

  1. If the LEA is having difficulty ensuring FAPE for an individual student or a particular disability category, describe the procedures and analysis methods used to determine gaps in the continuum of special education supports, services and education placement options available for students with disabilities.
  2. Include information detailing successful programs, services, education placements as well as identified gaps in current programs, services, and education placements not available within the LEA. Include an overview of services provided through interagency collaboration within the LEA.
  3. Discuss any expansion of the continuum of services planned during the life of this plan.

The Duquesne City School District works with the Allegheny Intermediate Unit's Interagency coordinator to provide supports for students who are difficult to place. IEP team members meet to review and discuss whether or not the student's needs are being met, and if revisions needs to made to the specially designed instruction and goals. Adequate time is given to provide progress monitoring on these goals, and to determine whether or not a change in placement is justified. This process may be revised several times, and data collected over a period of weeks prior to any decisions regarding a change of placement.
If the team determines that the student's needs can no longer be met in the existing setting, alternative contacts will be made. In the event that the placement cannot be secured in a timely manner, the district will report this information to PDE, updating monthly, until an appropriate placement has been secured. Pendency is requested by the existing placement so as not to deny a student services. Additionally, the district will report students who are on Homebound Instruction or receiving Instruction in the Home to the Department of Education.
The district continues to monitor and support families as provided by Interagency Team meetings, and resolve ways in which to provide FAPE to students whose needs are more restrictive by definition. At Duquesne, the Director of Special Education, or her designee, participates in interagency meetings held by various providers, including psychiatric hospitals, partial hospitalization programs and shelters. Attendance and discipline data are closely monitored during discussion time frames.
The district takes advantage of trainings offered by PDE, PaTTAN and the Allegheny Intermediate unit utilizing webcasts to address several audiences at one time. The district is building capacity via seminars, webinars and trainings as well as networking within the systems of supports. Social service agencies are also valuable resources necessary to securing appropriate services for students and families in need. Assistance is often provided with the completion of paperwork, locating medical personnel, and support for other types of assistance.

Strengths and Highlights

Describe the strengths and highlights of your current special education services and programs. Include in this section directions on how the district provides trainings for staff, faculty and parents.

The Duquesne City School District is committed to provided  a free and appropriate education to all of its students, regardless of where they may be physically. Through the screening process and supports which begin with the Student Assistance Team, to the final evaluations and determination of eligibility, the staff at Duquesne is beyond dedicated in securing that which our students need to survive and then grow.
Duquesne engages in mindful determination in the identification and placement of students requiring specially designed instruction. A meaningful and forward directed Individualized Education Plan is developed, with focus on where the students needs would best be served, and at what level of support. Students who qualify under Chapter 15 (504 plans/ medical necessity) or are dually identify under both Chapter 16 and 14 are provided an equal opportunity to participate in services and accommodations. All services and accommodations afforded to non identified students are likewise provided to eligible students in that the are able to benefit  from the the district's educational programming and extracurricular activities. Chapter 16 (Gifted) educational opportunities are also offered to those students in the district who qualify.
The families of pre-school children experiencing developmental delays, and physical and/or intellectual disabilities are eligible for Early Intervention (EI) services. Duquesne collaborates with the Allegheny Intermediate Unit to ensure that early identification occurs in a timely manner, and supports and services are offered when eligibility is determined. Transition meetings for early intervention are held in February each year as students are designated kindergarten ready. School age re-evaluations are conducted on these students, and needed supports and services are offered in the IEP development process.
The Duquesne City School District after school program offers both Fall and Spring sessions. These are held for two hours after school to provide additional reading and mathematics supports. Individual Learning Plans are developed by a team consisting of the reading and math coaches, and the classroom teacher who together review data and determine the most effective plan to close the gaps in academics.
The Boys and Girls Club of Duquesne runs an after school program that co-runs with the Duquesne after school program. Bussing home is provided. Our collaborative efforts have created a meaningful partnership with the B&GC of Duquesne.
Morning Meetings and CHAMPs have been instituted by the district with much success. PATHs, Olweus and social skills are practiced daily, and a sense of community is created. These Tier 1 supports are extremely beneficial in the promotion of positive behaviors and the creation of an environment conducive to learning.
Grade level, Professional Learning Communities meet weekly to collaborate and examine data which in turns assist in the immediate focus for learning. Struggling students are identified and helped early in the semester, without having to wait for the completion of an evaluation or intervention, or being identified as 'special education' prematurely. Special Educators meet twice monthly and are provided professional development opportunities. Paraprofessionals and Personal care assistants also meet twice monthly to discuss topical areas of concern, areas of need and state requirements. They are encouraged to interact with their supervising teacher, and to assist in the development of positive behavior and academic support for the students they serve. All special education staff are CPR/First Aid trained, Mandated Reporter trained, and have gone through the CPI Non Violent Crisis Intervention program.
Our Crisis Team is another highlight of the district's dedication to students. Made up of our nurse, counselor, psychologist, assistant principal, special education director, and two student services team members, this core team is able to assess a situation quickly and support the student in crisis without a lot of drama. Team members are trained or certified in NCI, and risk assessment. Collaboration with Mon-Yough counseling services, CACTIS, and RESOLVE, and many other community agencies allows the team to focus on the student and the family. Postvention meetings occur regularly to discuss what went well and where, as a team, we could improve.
 


Assurances

Safe and Supportive Schools Assurances

The LEA has verified the following Assurances:

  • Implementation of a comprehensive and integrated K-12 program of student services based on the needs of its students. (in compliance with § 12.41(a))
  • Free Education and Attendance (in compliance with § 12.1)
  • School Rules (in compliance with § 12.3)
  • Collection, maintenance and dissemination of student records (in compliance § 12.31(a) and § 12.32)
  • Discrimination (in compliance with § 12.4)
  • Corporal Punishment (in compliance with § 12.5)
  • Exclusion from School, Classes, Hearings (in compliance with § 12.6, § 12.7, § 12.8)
  • Freedom of Expression (in compliance with § 12.9)
  • Flag Salute and Pledge of Allegiance (in compliance with § 12.10)
  • Hair and Dress (in compliance with § 12.11)
  • Confidential Communications (in compliance with § 12.12)
  • Searches (in compliance with § 12.14)
  • Emergency Care and Administration of Medication and Treatment (in compliance with 35 P.S. § 780-101—780-144)
  • Parents or guardians are informed regarding individual survey student assessments and provided a process for refusal to participate (consistent with § 445 of the General Education Provisions Act (20 U.S.C.A. § 1232h) and in compliance with § 12.41(d))
  • Persons delivering student services shall be specifically licensed or certified as required by statute or regulation (in compliance with § 12.41(e))
  • Development and Implementation of Local Wellness Program (in compliance with Public Law 108-265, Section 204)
  • Early Intervention Services System Act (if applicable) (11 P.S. § 875-101—875-503)
  • Establishment and Implementation of Student Assistance Programs at all of levels of the school system (in compliance with 24 PS § 15-1547)
  • Acceptable Use Policy for Technology Resources
  • Providing career information and assessments so that students and parents or guardians might become aware of the world of work and career options available.

 

Special Education Assurances

The Local Education Agency (District) has verified the following Assurances:

  • Implementation of a full range of services, programs and alternative placements available to the school district for placement and implementation of the special education programs in the school district.
  • Implementation of a child find system to locate, identify and evaluate young children and children who are thought to be a child with a disability eligible for special education residing within the school district's jurisdiction. Child find data is collected, maintained and used in decision-making. Child find process and procedures are evaluated for its effectiveness. The District implements mechanisms to disseminate child find information to the public, organizations, agencies and individuals on at least an annual basis.
  • Assurances of students with disabilities are included in general education programs and extracurricular and non-academic programs and activities to the maximum extent appropriate in accordance with an Individualized Education Program.
  • Compliance with the PA Department of Education, Bureau of Special Education's report revision notice process.
  • Following the state and federal guidelines for participation of students with disabilities in state and district-wide assessments including the determination of participation, the need for accommodations, and the methods of assessing students for whom regular assessment is not appropriate.
  • Assurance of funds received through participation in the medical assistance reimbursement program, ACCESS, will be used to enhance or expand the current level of services and programs provided to students with disabilities in this local education agency.

 

24 P.S. §1306 and §1306.2 Facilities

There are no facilities.

 

Least Restrictive Environment Facilities

Facility Name

Type of Facility

Type of Service

Number of Students Placed

Holy Family Learning

Approved Private Schools

Emotional Support

1

Western PA School for Blind Children

Approved Private Schools

Visual/Blind support

1

Western PA School for Deaf Children

Approved Private Schools

Hearing and Deaf

1

Pressley Ridge

Approved Private Schools

Emotional Support

1

Wesley Academy

Approved Private Schools

Emotional Support

1

Mon Valley School

Special Education Centers

Autism, Intellectual Disability, Emotional Support, Career and Technical Center

2

 

 

Special Education Program Profile

Program Position #1 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: ClassandPosition

Implementation Date: July 1, 2015

Average square feet in regular classrooms: 625 sq. ft.

Square footage of this classroom: 594 sq. ft. (27 feet long x 22 feet wide)

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Location/Building

Grade

Building Type

Support

Service Type

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Duquesne Elementary School

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Itinerant

Speech and Language Support

5 to 12

60

1

Justification: Age ranges will be addressed in the IEP whenever or if a group exceeds the age range allowed by the special education regulations. Speech groups ordinarily meet within their age ranges.

 

Program Position #2 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Class

Implementation Date: August 25, 2014

Average square feet in regular classrooms:  sq. ft.

Square footage of this classroom:  sq. ft. ( feet long x  feet wide)

Justification: Compliance for proximity to home, classroom design (for instruction), classroom external noise, classroom accessibility, classroom location, classroom size was marked as inappropriate.

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Location/Building

Grade

Building Type

Support

Service Type

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Duquesne Elementary School, Duquesne, PA

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Emotional Support

6 to 9

6

1

 

Program Position #3 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Class

Implementation Date: August 25, 2014

Average square feet in regular classrooms:  sq. ft.

Square footage of this classroom:  sq. ft. ( feet long x  feet wide)

Justification: Compliance for proximity to home, classroom design (for instruction), classroom external noise, classroom accessibility, classroom location, classroom size was marked as inappropriate.

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Location/Building

Grade

Building Type

Support

Service Type

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Duquesne Elementary School, Duquesne, PA

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Emotional Support

10 to 13

7

1

 

Program Position #4 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Class

Implementation Date: August 24, 2015

Average square feet in regular classrooms: 625 sq. ft.

Square footage of this classroom: 672 sq. ft. (28 feet long x 24 feet wide)

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Location/Building

Grade

Building Type

Support

Service Type

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Duquesne Elementary School, Duquesne, PA

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Autistic Support

6 to 9

4

0.5

 

Program Position #5 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Class

Implementation Date: August 24, 2015

Average square feet in regular classrooms: 625 sq. ft.

Square footage of this classroom: 672 sq. ft. (28 feet long x 24 feet wide)

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Location/Building

Grade

Building Type

Support

Service Type

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Duquesne Elementary School, Duquesne, PA

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Life Skills Support

5 to 8

5

0.5

 

Program Position #6 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Class

Implementation Date: August 25, 2014

Average square feet in regular classrooms:  sq. ft.

Square footage of this classroom:  sq. ft. ( feet long x  feet wide)

Justification: Compliance for proximity to home, classroom design (for instruction), classroom external noise, classroom accessibility, classroom location, classroom size was marked as inappropriate.

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Location/Building

Grade

Building Type

Support

Service Type

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Duquesne Elementary School, Duquesne, PA

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Itinerant

Learning Support

5 to 7

3

0.5

Duquesne Elementary School. Duquesne, PA

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Learning Support

6 to 8

3

0.5

 

Program Position #7 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Class

Implementation Date: August 25, 2014

Average square feet in regular classrooms:  sq. ft.

Square footage of this classroom:  sq. ft. ( feet long x  feet wide)

Justification: Compliance for proximity to home, classroom design (for instruction), classroom external noise, classroom accessibility, classroom location, classroom size was marked as inappropriate.

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Location/Building

Grade

Building Type

Support

Service Type

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Duquesne Elementary School, Duquesne, PA

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Itinerant

Learning Support

8 to 10

9

0.5

Duquesne Elementary School. Duquesne, PA

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Learning Support

9 to 11

5

0.5

 

Program Position #8 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Class

Implementation Date: August 25, 2014

Average square feet in regular classrooms:  sq. ft.

Square footage of this classroom:  sq. ft. ( feet long x  feet wide)

Justification: Compliance for proximity to home, classroom design (for instruction), classroom external noise, classroom accessibility, classroom location, classroom size was marked as inappropriate.

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Location/Building

Grade

Building Type

Support

Service Type

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Duquesne Elementary School, Duquesne, PA

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Itinerant

Learning Support

11 to 13

7

0.5

Duquesne Elementary School, Duquesne, PA

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Learning Support

11 to 13

6

0.5

 

Program Position #9 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Class

Implementation Date: August 25, 2014

Average square feet in regular classrooms:  sq. ft.

Square footage of this classroom:  sq. ft. ( feet long x  feet wide)

Justification: Compliance for proximity to home, classroom design (for instruction), classroom external noise, classroom accessibility, classroom location, classroom size was marked as inappropriate.

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Location/Building

Grade

Building Type

Support

Service Type

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Duquesne Elementary School, Duquesne, PA

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Life Skills Support

9 to 12

9

0.5

Duquesne Elementary School, Duquesne, PA 15110

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Autistic Support

9 to 11

2

0.5

 

Program Position #10 - Proposed Program

Operator: School District

PROPOSED PROGRAM INFORMATION

Type: Class

Implementation Date: August 25, 2014

Average square feet in regular classrooms: 400 sq. ft.

Square footage of this classroom: 420 sq. ft. (28 feet long x 15 feet wide)

PROGRAM SEGMENTS

Location/Building

Grade

Building Type

Support

Service Type

Age Range

Caseload

FTE

Duquesne City School District, Duquesne, PA 15110

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Autistic Support

6 to 9

4

0.5

Duquesne City School District, Duquesne, PA 15110

An Elementary School Building

A building in which General Education programs are operated

Supplemental (Less Than 80% but More Than 20%)

Life Skills Support

6 to 9

5

0.5

 

 

Special Education Support Services

Support Service

Location

Teacher FTE

Nurse

Duquesne Elementary School

1

Psychologist

Duquesne Elementary School

1

Counselor

Duquesne Elementary School

1

Personal Care Assistants

Duquesne Elementary School

7

Paraprofesionals

Duquesne Elementary School

14

Behavior Intervention Specialist

Duquesne City School District

1

Student Assistance Team Leader

Duquesne City School District

1

Behavior Support Specialist

Duquesne Elementary School

1

 

 

Special Education Contracted Services

Special Education Contracted Services

Operator

Amt of Time per Week

Occupational Therapy

Intermediate Unit

2 Days

Physical Therapy

Intermediate Unit

30 Minutes

Adapted PE

Intermediate Unit

30 Minutes

Special Education Consultant

Outside Contractor

3 Days

 


Needs Assessment

Record School Patterns

Question:

After reviewing school level accomplishments and systemic challenges, what patterns can you identify among your schools?

What other information do you still need to assess?

Answer:

There continue to be discrepancies between reading and math achievement and performance. There is an increasing need for MH/MR services across the student population as a reflection of the community's challenging demographics.  Early Intervention, Head Start, DART programs have been shown to improve student achievement at the primary level. The district has exceptional family and community participation in school -entered events. However, there continues to be a need to train parents on how to support the academic and behaviorial needs of their children. The PVAAS data has shown continuous steady growth over the past three years in all grades and areas except 5th grade ELA and 4th grade Science. The school's growth as reported by PVAAS shows that student growth was among the highest in the state for 2013-14.  We recognize that instructional staff continue to struggle with the effective use of student data with confidence and proficiency. 

 

District Accomplishments

Accomplishment #1:

The district continues to seek funds that support the vigorous academic goals documented in the Duquesne City SD Recovery Plan. These additional funds are generated by the following grants:  Title IA to support students at risk of failing; Title I School Improvement Grant to support school improvement goals; Title I School Intervention Grant to support the development of instructional leadership; Title IIA to support the development of effective instructional strategies through professional development, and STEAM that supports student achievement in science, technology, arts, and math.

Accomplishment #2:

The district established extended day and extended year programming that provides academic enrichment, tutoring, and health and social development activities.

Accomplishment #3:

The district established a full day four-year-old program in 2014-15 with15 students and expanded the program in 2015-16 to two classrooms with a total of 24 students.

Accomplishment #4:

The district is in stable financial condition as it implements the Duquesne City School District Recovery Plan.  As a result of the district's balanced budget the following were made possible: student technology access is close to reaching a 1 to 1 ratio; 100% of instructional staff have technology embedded in their classrooms; new curriculum resources for English Language Arts (Journeys) and math (GoMath) were purchased; and the district's average class size is 17.

Accomplishment #5:

The district continues to operate compliant programs as evidenced by PA Department of Education monitoring site visits and reports for the following: Federal Priority School Monitoring, Federal Programs (Title IA, Title IIA, and Fiscal Operations) Compliance Monitoring; Federal School Improvement Grant (three monitorings per year for the life of the grant);  and Special Education Compliance Reporting/Monitoring. 

Accomplishment #6:

The district continues to support leadership development by targeting resources for continued professional development among the administrative team.

Accomplishment #7:

The district committed resources to fully fund the extended day and extended year programs when the partnership with Boys and Girls Club ended.

Accomplishment #8:

The district committed resources to the development and enhancement of communication channels within its community in the following ways: a new (summer 2015) website; social media (Twitter, Facebook); One Call (direct communication regarding school information); school calendar; Parent-Student Handbook; brochures; and various marketing materials to encourage the transfer of students from charter schools back to the Duquesne Elementary School.

Accomplishment #9:

The district supports the Curriculum Steering Committee (membership comprised of district and school level representatives and educational consultants) that works to align curriculum with the PA Instructional Framework and the PA Core Standards.

Accomplishment #10:

The amount of interest bearing debt has been reduced from $14.1M in 2012 to $6.6M in 2015, thus freeing debt service for educational purposes.

 

District Concerns

Concern #1:

It is a concern that PSSA scores continue to remain low in math, ELA, and science, although the SPP (2013-14) composite level academic score increased 5% over the previous year and 2015 PVAAS numbers indicate academic growth at:  Math/100, ELA/79, and Science/58.

Concern #2:

It is a concern that all programs, services, people, and resources continue to be aligned with student academic achievement.

Concern #3:

It is a concern that the district continues to lose students to charter schools.  The number of Duquesne City SD students attending charter schools increased from 129 in 2012 to 186 in 2015.

Concern #4:

It is a concern that teachers, parents, families, administrators, and the community understand the need to focus on academic rigor and maintain high expectations for student academic achievement.

Concern #5:

It is a concern that the district must ensure consistent and continued collaboration and communication among all stakeholders to support student academic achievement goals.

Concern #6:

It is a concern that there will be appropriate and sufficient resources to support the increasing emotional and mental health needs of students.

Concern #7:

It is a concern that existing technology infrastructure is adequate to support future instructional initiatives that may include utilizing more online instructional resources and learning devices.

Concern #8:

It is a concern that systems are in place to ensure resources (people, facilities, and funding) are aligned with district and school goals.

 

Prioritized Systemic Challenges

Systemic Challenge #1 (Guiding Question #1) Establish a district system that fully ensures consistent implementation of standards aligned curricula across all schools for all students.

Aligned Concerns:

It is a concern that the district continues to lose students to charter schools.  The number of Duquesne City SD students attending charter schools increased from 129 in 2012 to 186 in 2015.

 

It is a concern that PSSA scores continue to remain low in math, ELA, and science, although the SPP (2013-14) composite level academic score increased 5% over the previous year and 2015 PVAAS numbers indicate academic growth at:  Math/100, ELA/79, and Science/58.

 

It is a concern that systems are in place to ensure resources (people, facilities, and funding) are aligned with district and school goals.

 

It is a concern that existing technology infrastructure is adequate to support future instructional initiatives that may include utilizing more online instructional resources and learning devices.

 

It is a concern that all programs, services, people, and resources continue to be aligned with student academic achievement.

 

Systemic Challenge #2 (Guiding Question #7) Establish a district system that fully ensures students who are academically at risk are identified early and are supported by a process that provides interventions based upon student needs and includes procedures for monitoring effectiveness.

Aligned Concerns:

It is a concern that the district continues to lose students to charter schools.  The number of Duquesne City SD students attending charter schools increased from 129 in 2012 to 186 in 2015.

 

It is a concern that PSSA scores continue to remain low in math, ELA, and science, although the SPP (2013-14) composite level academic score increased 5% over the previous year and 2015 PVAAS numbers indicate academic growth at:  Math/100, ELA/79, and Science/58.

 

It is a concern that there will be appropriate and sufficient resources to support the increasing emotional and mental health needs of students.

 

It is a concern that systems are in place to ensure resources (people, facilities, and funding) are aligned with district and school goals.

 

It is a concern that teachers, parents, families, administrators, and the community understand the need to focus on academic rigor and maintain high expectations for student academic achievement.

 

It is a concern that the district must ensure consistent and continued collaboration and communication among all stakeholders to support student academic achievement goals.

 

It is a concern that all programs, services, people, and resources continue to be aligned with student academic achievement.

 

Systemic Challenge #3 (Guiding Question #11) Establish a district system that fully ensures teachers and administrators receive timely, effective support and intervention as needed.

Aligned Concerns:

It is a concern that PSSA scores continue to remain low in math, ELA, and science, although the SPP (2013-14) composite level academic score increased 5% over the previous year and 2015 PVAAS numbers indicate academic growth at:  Math/100, ELA/79, and Science/58.

 

It is a concern that systems are in place to ensure resources (people, facilities, and funding) are aligned with district and school goals.

 

It is a concern that all programs, services, people, and resources continue to be aligned with student academic achievement.

 

Systemic Challenge #4 (Guiding Question #12) Establish a district system that fully ensures classrooms are staffed with highly qualified teachers.

Aligned Concerns:

It is a concern that PSSA scores continue to remain low in math, ELA, and science, although the SPP (2013-14) composite level academic score increased 5% over the previous year and 2015 PVAAS numbers indicate academic growth at:  Math/100, ELA/79, and Science/58.

 

It is a concern that systems are in place to ensure resources (people, facilities, and funding) are aligned with district and school goals.

 

It is a concern that all programs, services, people, and resources continue to be aligned with student academic achievement.

 


District Level Plan

Action Plans

Goal #1: Establish a district system that fully ensures students who are academically at risk are identified early and are supported by a process that provides interventions based upon student needs and includes procedures for monitoring effectiveness.

Indicators of Effectiveness:

Type: Annual

Data Source: Formal and informal observations, classroom walk-throughs, lesson plan review, educator improvement plans, Educator Effectiveness reports.

Specific Targets: 100 % of instructional staff will demonstrate utilization of the SAS Interventions and Classroom Diagnostic Tools sections of the PA Standards Aligned System (SAS).

100% of Flex Time lesson plans will include diagnostic information obtained from SAS.

100% of Flex Time interventions will demonstrate a connection to individual student data.

 

Strategies:

Explicit Instruction

Description:

Explicit Instruction is a multi-step model that focuses on developing students' complex problem solving skills.  With guided instruction, students are cognitively engaged to build and extend their skills through practice, repetition and hands-on activities.   

Explicit instruction includes the following sequence of events to mastery:  telling (a clear explanation of expectations); showing (a modeling of the process); scaffolding (temporary supports as needed); and practice (guided, independent, distributed and cumulative).  The instruction process moves systematically from extensive teacher support with little student responsibility to full student responsibility and the teacher as facilitator. 

The Explicit Instruction Components include:

A.  Communicating Learning Goals/Lesson Objectives

B.  Retrieve and Utilize Prior Knowledge

C.  Modeling

D.  Scaffolding:  Vocabulary, Chunking, Frequent Formative Assessment, Non-linguistic Representations, Summarizing, Note-taking, small group instruction, etc.

E.  Questioning and Frequent Student Responses 

F.  Practice

G.  Closure

SAS Alignment: Standards, Assessment, Curriculum Framework, Instruction, Materials & Resources

Daily 5 Reading Framework and the Daily 3 Math Framework

Description:

  

The Daily Five is a literacy structure that allows for differentiation and consistency in the classroom within the ELA Block. It consists of a series of literacy tasks which students complete daily while the teacher meets with small groups or confers with individuals. Created by teaching sisters, Gail Bouschey & Joan Moser (“The Sisters”), The Daily 5 developed a new way of thinking in organizing classroom literacy instruction. Using their processes for teaching students, the classroom is designed for student success, ownership of their learning, and fosters a love of reading.  The Daily Five is a classroom structure that will help students develop the daily habits of reading, writing and working with peers that will lead to a lifetime of independent literacy.   It is designed to fully engage students in reading and writing. The Daily Five promotes high student engagement, meaningful reading and writing activities with the majority of time spent reading. The five literacy tasks associated with the Daily Five are: Read to Self, Read to Someone, Work on Writing, Listen to Reading, and Word Work. The Daily Five provides students with substantial time to read and write.  It allows for integration of reading and writing skills and incorporates a variety of clearly defined instructional routines that can accelerate the learning process. The implementation of these tasks in the classroom aim to foster student independence and promote reading stamina. Increasing reading stamina can ensure longer periods of time students spend successfully reading and writing. Implementing the Daily 5 also supports students in understanding and monitoring their literacy goals. 

Based on literacy learning and motivation research, The Daily 5 has been practiced and refined in the developers’ classrooms for ten years and shared with thousands of teachers throughout the United States. Horsch, Chen, & Nelson (1999) explain the creation of a responsive classroom, which leads to greater student responsibility and self—control both of which are essential for independent learning to take place. The Daily 5 is grounded in theory by researchers such as Lienhardt, Sigmond, and Cooley (1981) who found that the way teachers structure the learning environment and the way students spend their time influences the level of reading proficiency the students have attained at the end of the academic year. Margaret Mooney, a literacy instructional expert from New Zealand, emphasized that students should be reading and revisiting books as the teacher works with students, a component of The Daily 5.

The Daily Five can be successfully implemented with any reading program and will fit in with the work the teachers began this year in ELA. The Daily Five allows for teachers to set up their literacy block to include the critical reading components necessary to build reading success and will build upon the small group time started this year. This program will streamline RtII time more effectively and consistently across the grade levels. 

The Daily 3 Math Framework is the structure that allows for differentiation and consistency in the mathematics classroom.  It is the partner program to the Daily 5.  It follows along with the research that supports the Daily 5 Framework.

SAS Alignment: Standards, Curriculum Framework, Instruction

Implementation Steps:

Instructional staff will demonstrate proficiency with the PA Standards Aligned System

Description:

Professional development training modules will be developed to train staff in the SAS system with priority attention given to the tools and resources associated with differentiating instruction.  Instructional staff will demonstrate proficiency in their design and implementation of FLEX time lessons.  

Start Date: 2/1/2016       End Date: 4/4/2016

Program Area(s): Professional Education

Supported Strategies:

·         Explicit Instruction

·         Daily 5 Reading Framework and the Daily 3 Math Framework

 

 

Goal #2: Establish a district system that fully ensures consistent implementation of standards aligned curricula across all schools for all students.

Indicators of Effectiveness:

Type: Interim

Data Source:  The district's curriculum writer tool.

 

Specific Targets: Curriculum writing committees established; an implementation plan with timeline completed, and additional staff time scheduled.

 

Strategies:

Curriculum Mapping

Description: Empirical evidence of a positive statistical correlation of the use of curriculum mapping with student achievement is scarce. There was a 2001 study by the Indiana Center of Evaluation conducted for the Ohio DOE that determined curriculum alignment (defined as curriculum mapping with subsequent change in instructional practice) was the “single greatest factor in achieving improved test scores.” The following link provides a list of resources supporting the positive contributions of curriculum mapping to educational processes: http://www.curriculummapping101.com/materials/curriculum-mapping-research ; the following link provides an overview of curriculum mapping: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curriculum_mapping

SAS Alignment: Standards, Materials & Resources

Implementation Steps:

The Implementation Plan and Timeline

Description:

The Curriculum Steering Committe will develop the implementation plan and timeline. 

Start Date: 1/11/2016       End Date: 3/30/2016

Program Area(s):

Supported Strategies:

·         Curriculum Mapping

 

The curricula for all courses and content areas clearly delineate what students are supposed to know and be able to do (i.e., there are written competencies for all courses at all grade levels.)

Description:

Complete curriculum mapping to the standards to ensure that all courses and content areas clearly delineate what students are supposed to know and be able to do. Ensure that  there are written competencies for all courses and that instructional practices, assessments, and interventions are aligned to PA standards.  The Curriculum Steering Committee will develop an implementation plan and timeline to ensure that this goal is met.

Start Date: 2/29/2016       End Date: 6/30/2017

Program Area(s):

Supported Strategies:

·         Curriculum Mapping

 

 

Goal #3: Establish a district system that fully ensures teachers and administrators receive timely, effective support and intervention as needed.

Indicators of Effectiveness:

Type: Annual

Data Source: An administrator's induction plan document

 

 

Specific Targets: Work committee established; work meetings scheduled; draft plans created; final document approved.

 

Strategies:

Substantial Professional Development

Description: The Southwest Regional Educational Laboratory found that substantial professional development showed a positive impact upon student achievement (substantial = greater than 14 hours of focused professional development delivered via workshops or summer institutes, supported by follow-up sessions and all delivered by professional developers rather than train-the-trainer approaches). (Source: http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/regions/southwest/pdf/rel_2007033.pdf )

SAS Alignment: Instruction

Plan, Design, Implement an Administrative Induction Plan

Description:

The district will establish an Induction Committee to research, plan, design, and create an Administrative Induction Plan.

SAS Alignment: None selected

Implementation Steps:

Appoint professional development committee members

Description:

The district will appoint committee members to develop the plan for district review and approval.

Start Date: 1/11/2016       End Date: 1/11/2016

Program Area(s):

Supported Strategies:

·         Substantial Professional Development

·         Plan, Design, Implement an Administrative Induction Plan

 

Invest in growth and leadership opportunities for all employees.

Description:

Create a comprehensive professional development plan that includes leadership training.

Develop a and maintain a system that supports job-specific individual professional development plans.

Start Date: 3/14/2016       End Date: 8/1/2016

Program Area(s): Professional Education

Supported Strategies:

·         Substantial Professional Development

·         Plan, Design, Implement an Administrative Induction Plan

 

 

Goal #4: Establish a district system that fully ensures classrooms are staffed with highly qualified teachers.

Indicators of Effectiveness:

Type: Annual

Data Source: Hiring approvals and start dates, job specific professional development plans, percentage of staff rated highly effective on performance evaluations

 

Specific Targets: Open positions for which there are qualified applications will be filled within 30 days.

 

Strategies:

Establish a district system that fully ensures the district and its school are fully staffed at all times.

Description:

Create hiring procedures that ensure staffing needs are identified, prioritized, and addressed in a timely manner.

SAS Alignment: Materials & Resources

Implementation Steps:

Create hiring standards and expectations for all job categories.

Description:

The district will appoint a committee to research, plan, and design hiring standards and expectations for all job categories. 

Start Date: 3/31/2016       End Date: 5/31/2016

Program Area(s):

Supported Strategies:

·         Establish a district system that fully ensures the district and its school are fully staffed at all times.

 

 


Appendix: Professional Development Implementation Step Details

No Professional Development Implementation Steps have been identified for Duquesne City SD.


District Level Affirmations

 

We affirm that this District Level Plan was developed in accordance, and will comply with the applicable provisions of 22 Pa. Code, Chapters 4, 12, 16, and 49. We also affirm that the contents are true and correct and that the plan was placed for public inspection in the school district/AVTS offices and in the nearest public library until the next regularly scheduled meeting of the board or for a minimum or 28 days whichever comes first.

We affirm that the responses in the Professional Education Core Foundations and the Professional Development Implementation Steps focus on the learning needs of each staff member to enable all staff members meet or exceed the Pennsylvania academic standards in each of the core subject areas.

Affirmed by Paul Long on 11/2/2015

Board President

Affirmed by Barbara McDonnell on 11/2/2015

Superintendent/Chief Executive Officer

 


Special Education Affirmations

 

We also affirm our understanding that any requests for any deviations from the Chapter 14 regulations, standards, policies, and procedures must be made in writing to the Pennsylvania Department of Education. The school district understands that the Special Education Component of the District Level Plan will be approved by PDE in accordance with the following criteria as set forth in 22 Pa. School Code § 14.104 and as part of the District Level Plan:

  1. There are a full range of services, programs and alternative placements available to the school district for placement and implementation of the special education programs in the school district.
  2. The school district has adopted a child find system to locate, identify and evaluate young children and children who are thought to be a child with a disability eligible for special education residing within the school district's jurisdiction. Child find data is collected, maintained, and used in decision-making. Child find process and procedures are evaluated for its effectiveness. The school district implements mechanisms to disseminate child find information to the public, organizations, agencies, and individuals on at least an annual basis.
  3. The school district has adopted policies and procedures that assure that students with disabilities are included in general education programs and extracurricular and non-academic programs and activities to the maximum extent appropriate in accordance with an Individualized Education Program.
  4. The school district will comply with the PA Department of Education, Bureau of Special Education's revision notice process.
  5. The school district follows the state and federal guidelines for participation of students with disabilities in state and district-wide assessments including the determination of participation, the need for accommodations, and the methods of assessing students for whom regular assessment is not appropriate.
  6. The school district affirms the Pennsylvania Department of Education that funds received through participation in the medical assistance reimbursement program, ACCESS, will be used to enhance or expand the current level of services and programs provided to students with disabilities in this local education agency.

Affirmed by Paul Long on 8/9/2015

Board President

Affirmed by Barbara McDonnell on 8/3/2015

Superintendent/Chief Executive Officer

 


300 Kennedy Ave | Duquesne, PA 15110 | (412) 466-9600